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XmaS, 1927 



Eugene F. Phillips 
Electrical Works, Limited 



ESTABLISHED 1889 



ej a 



£%Canufacturers of 



BARE AND INSULATED 
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Lead Covered Cables for 

Lighting, Power and Telephone 

Varnished Cambric Insulated Cables 

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Please patronize our Advertisers and mention B.C.S. Magazine" 



©loop's Goiim @cijooi 

lennoxoille, <©ue. 



^eabmasiter 

S. P. Smith, M.A., Oxon. 

m 
^eaomastcr, preparatory g>cf)ool 

A. Wilkinson, Esq. 

HI 

Visttorss 

The Lord Bishop of Quebec 
' The Lord Bishop of Montreal 

a 
directors 

Grant Hall, Esq., M.A., Chairman 

Major H. B. MacDougall, Vice-Chairman 

Commander J. K. L. Ross 

D. N. C. Hogg, Esq., M.A., LL.B. 

Chas. M. Holt, Esq., K.C., LL.D. 

Lt-Colonel H. S. McGreevy 

Lt. Colonel Herbert Molson, C.M.G., M.C. 

Geo. H. Montgomery, Esq., K.C. 

Major A. E. Ogilvie 

Major J. H. Price, M.C. 

Major P. F. Sise 

G. W. MacDougall, K.C. 

T. S. Gillespie, Esq. 

F. W. Ross, Esq. 

Major S. B. Coristine 

W. W. Robinson, Esq. 

The Headmaster 

11 

Secretary-Treasurer, Lewis Brimacombe, Esq. 
180 St. James Street, Montreal. 



@cfjooI Officers, 1927=28 



prefects 



L. S. Bunco D. K. Drdry 

,J. P. Fuller H. L. Duggan 

.1. P. Cleghorn G. A. Sharp 



©ormitorp ILieutenaritg 

L. Y. Read G. D. Roberts 
L. P. Payan T. M. Gillespie 
G. G. Black J. R. Simms 



Cabet Corps 



Captain: L. S. Blinco 

1st Lieutenant: J. P. Fuller 

2nd Lieutenant: D. K. Drury 

C.S.M.: P. B. Coristine 



Recreation Committee 

President: The Headmaster 
Vice-President: A. Wilkinson, Esq. 



jfootball 

L. S. Blinco. Captain 



©rtSbctbdli 
L. S. Blinco, Captain 



jUlagajine ^>taff 



Editor: — R. L. Young 

Literary Editors: — H. I. Kennedy, I. Ogilvie, H. M. Howell, G. H. Montgomery 

Business Managers: — D. K. Drury, T. M. Gillespie, G. A. Sharp, J. P. Cleghorn 

Sports Editors: — L. B. Doucet, C M. Drury, G. H. MacDougall, J. N. Pierce 

Secretary: — H. L. Duggan 

Exchange Editor: — F. G. Taylor 

Art Editors: — A. Barry, H. Langston 

Form Staff 

V — G. H. Montgomery IV — R. R. McLernon 

IIIA— D. S. Gurd IIIB— H. Langston 



VI — L. B. Doucet 



lUbrarp 

Librarians: — P. B. Coristine, L. B. Doucet 

debating £s>ocietp 

President: R. L. Young 

Vice-President: D. K. Drury 

Secretaries: — H. I. Kennedy, I. Ogilvie, T. M. Gillespie, G. H. Montgomery 

Poet Laureate: — P. B. Coristine 

Treasurer: — C. M. Drury 

M.C.:— T. R. Kenny 



Cup Committee anb Picture Committee 

D. C. Markey and P. W. Blaylock 



jforetoorb 



When I was invited to write a "Forewood" for the Christmas Number 
of the Bishop's College School Magazine I accepted at once, partly because 
I felt gratified that the boys wished me to do so, and partly because, as an "Old 
Boy," I have a very real affection for the Old School where I was born when 
my father was the Head Master, and where, later on, I spent five or six years 
between the ages of eleven and seventeen, getting, I hope, a certain amount 
of knowledge knocked into me, and more important still, getting hold of some 
of the outstanding vital principles of true manhood, viz: — truth, honour, and 
fair play, the spirit which would scorn to tell a lie to escape punishment, or to 
win a game or any contest by unfair means or foul play. As I say, I accepted 
the invitation at once; but now I confess that I am rather at a loss to know 
what is expected in a "Foreword." 

However, there is one thing which I wish to say, and this Foreword gives 
me the opportunity to say it, and it is this: 

I do hope that Christmas will be kept in the right spirit, and that in the 
midst of all the joy of happy home gatherings, the giving and receiving of presents, 
the feasting and fun and gladness which quite rightly surround Christmas, we 
shall remember those who are not so well off as ourselves, and in some generous 
and practical way try to bring comfort and happiness into the lives of some 
of them. 

Above all I hope that we shall never forget, in all our rejoicings, that Christ- 
mas is the Birthday of the Christ Child; and that our hearts will be filled with 
love for Him so that we shall all offer Him our adoration, praise and thanks- 
giving in the worship of the Church on Christmas Day. 

With all my heart I wish the Head Master, the other Masters, and all 
the boys of Bishop's College School the good old wish: "A Merry Christmas 
and a Happy New Year." 



Bishopthorpe, 



OC%U<4^k(]^u£lCC. 




THE RIGHT REV. THE LORD BISHOP OF QUEBEC. 



Qage of Qonour 

1927 

FOOTBALL 

Won all games scoring 124 points against 21 
(in School games) 

HOCKEY 
Won all games except one. 

CADET CORPS 

Won the Governor-General's Shield 
for the Dominion of Canada. 

McGILL 

Arts and Science combined: 3 boys passed. 

14 boys out of 15 passed McGill Matriculation 

without any supplemental. 

6 boys passed into R.M.C. 

TROPHIES WON 

Shirley Russel Cup. 
Governor -General's Shield. 



(Efaga^me @taft 

ebttor 

R. L. Young, Esq. 



Utterarp €bttors( 

H. I. Kennedy I. Ogilvie 

H. M. Howell G. H. Montgomery 



g>porte €bttorg 

C. M. Drury J. N. Pierce 

G. H. MacDougall L. B. Doucet 



Jiufimeste ^Managers 



D. K. Drury 
T. M. Gillespie 



G. A. Sharp 
J. P. Cleghorn 



ikcretarp 

H. L. DuGGAN 



(Exchange €bitox 

F. G. Taylor 



Contents; for Xnta* 1927 



School Directors 

School Officers 

Foreword 

The Right Rev. the Lord Bishop of 

Page of Honour 

Magazine Staff 

Governor General's Shield 

Football, 1927 

The Old School from the New 

Prefatory Poem 

Memorial Tablet 

Editorial 

Poem — "In a Glade" 

School Notes 

Poem— "An Old Boy to his New A 

Valete and Salvete 

Bubbles 

B. C. S 

"Al Fresco." 

Debating Society Notes 

Poem — "At Sundown" 

Sixth Form Notes 

School Calendar 

Fifth Form Notes 

Fourth Form Notes 

IIIA Notes 

IIIB Notes 

Poem— "Old B.C. S." .. .. 

Exchanges 

Thanksgiving Day 

Poem— ; "The Meeting" . . 

Football 

Poem — "The Isle of Beauty" 

June Closing 

Preparatory School Notes . . 

Old Boys Notes 

R.M.C. Notes 

McGill Notes .. 

Poem — "God's in His Heaven." 

Engagements, Births, Marriages 

Poem — "Reign of Terror." 

Silver and Gold Medal Winners 

Subscribers (Old Boys) 

Short Stories: — 

"The Wetherby's House Party." 
"The Mystery of the San Juan." 



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Quebec 



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l 

2 
3 
4 
5 
6 
8 
9 
10 
11 
12 
13 
15 
16 
18 
19 
20 
21 
22 
23 
34 
35 
36 
37 
39 
41 
43 
45 
46 
48 
53 
55 
69 
70 
74 
81 
83 
83 
88 
89 
92 
93 
94 

97 
103 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




GOVERNOR-GENERAL'S SHIELD 

FOR THE DOMINION OF CANADA 

WON BY B. C. S. 

1927 

1924 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Jfootball, 1927 







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10 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




THE OLD SCHOOL FROM THE NEW. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 11 



There's a breathless hush in (he Close to-night — 

Ten to make and the match to win — 
A bumping pitch and a blinding light, 

An hour to play and the last man in. 
And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coal 

Or the selfish hope of a season's fame, 
But his Captain's hand on his shoulder smote; 

"Play up! Play up! And play the game!" 

The sand of the desert is sodden red — 

Red with the wreck of a square that broke; 
The Gatling's jammed and the colonel dead, 

And the regiment's blind ivith dust and smoke. 
The river of death has brimmed its banks, 

And England's far and Honour a name, 
But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the ranks, 

"Play up! Play up! And play the game!" 

This is the ivord that year by year, 

While in her place the School is set, 
Every one of her sons must hear, 

And none that hears it dare forget. 
This they all with a joyful mind 

Bear through life like a torch in flame, 
And falling, fling to the host behind — 

"Play up! Play up! And play the game!" 

HENRY NEWBOLT. 



.flgtE'HRjnpur 






tMiialfeQow 

E'VirEtnmiger 

S<mu>tttoaitfc 

o^atl^^QiaTt'i!) 

^UanlRouMeiig^ 

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pw^S^S 



Ijrorcpt tt noMb crau u 

apo Wonottr -apb-thp soul 
ofm tin ftpbic t» ■ t a tro ot< be 
uoubdj utitlva flr'ur? atui 
ivtrti^tio ttot dip unttoatt 



12 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 13 



Qbttortai 



"They do me wrong who say I come no more 
"There is a tide in the affairs of men When once I knock and fail to find you in; 

Which, taken al the flood, leads on to fortune; For every day I stand outside your door. 

Omitted, all the voyage of their life And bid you wake, to fight and win. 

Is bound in shallows and in miseries. 
On such a full sea are we now afloat; Wail not for precious chances passed away. 

And we must take the current when it serves. Weep not for golden ages on the wane! 

Or lose our ventures." Each niglil I burn the records of the day — 

At sunrise every soul is born again!" 

A cable across the Atlantic during the summer vacation brought joy to the hearts 
of some of us who were spending the holidays in the British Isles. It ran: "All boys 
passed McGill Matriculation exams., without supplemental!?, except 'X'." 

Rarely is such extreme good fortune duplicated during the course of one year. 
Fortune, however, paid us another visit and on her visiting card was written in letters of 
gold "Banner year for B.C.S. Football." 

Not content with this, Lady Fortune, scanning an old criterion of character, saw the 
ability of B.C.S. to: 

"Meet with Triumph or Disaster 
And treat those two imposters just the same." 

and honoured us with another visit, and this time the message told us that we had won 
the Governor General's Shield. 

This year, therefore, every record is probably beaten in B.C.S. Football, certainly 
in examination results and the winning of the Shield in 1924 is repeated. 

Only those who have experienced it can adequately realize the amount of spade work 
necessary for these results, for the polishing of the rough diamond. 

"You only know him groomed and combed 

And bridled on parade^ 
I know the paddocks where he roamed, 

I saw him roped and made." 

The dark inscrutable workmanship which reconciles discordant elements and makes them 
cling together in one Society, the terrors, pains and early miseries, regrets, vexations, 
lassitudes, interfused within a boy's mind have all had their part in making up the calm 
existence which is his when he is worthy of himself. 

When nature wants to make a man she doesn't invite him to a teaparty. There are 
no soft cushions lying around in B.C.S. and there isn't a nursery. Neither is there any 
tyranny. 



14 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



When nature wants to make a man — 

"Watch her method, watch her ways! 

How she ruthlessly perfects 

Whom she royally elects ; 

How she hammers him and hurts him 

And with mighty blows converts him 

Into trial shapes of clay which only Nature understands — 

While his tortured heart is crying and he lifts beseeching hands'— 

How she bends, but never breaks, 

When his good she undertakes — 

How she often disappoints — 

Whom she secretly anoints — " 

Here at School this constant, healthy activity of mind and body, produces a swelling 
current of life purifying itself and casts all the debris to the bank like a swelling river. 
Every branch of School activity does its part in effecting this. 

A very welcome and pleasant change during the School winter season is an occasional 
visit to a hut on the invitation of some lordly proprietor from the Fourth. Here one 
finds sanctuary. School seems like the Happy Land — far, far away; a fragrant cedar- 
wood fire is burning cheerily; you eat a tender partridge a la main with the carcase on 
your knee — horresco referens — and the world is right side uppermost. With his axe 
across his shoulder Mine Host escorts you home a la Robin Hood. 

Here's to having many years of full school life like the present! 

May we wish everybody a Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year — and, especially 
and sympathetically, parents, whose boys go home to worry them. Cheerio, Old Boys! 




BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 15 



IN A GLADE 

Let me see straight and far, 
In light as clear and fair 

As shimmers now from yonder star, 
In clean and rain-washed air! 

As helpless here I stand, 

The soul of such a scene 
To paint in verses bland; 

Let me see straight and clean! 

The tops of yonder pines 
Reach upward to the sky; 

The star between them shines 
Before God's naked eye. 

So, helpless, let me stand 
When shams shall intervene; 

So, let my soul expand 

And breathe this air serene. 

Let me see straight and far, 

So, let my goal appear! 
The pines to yonder star 

Point up, as to a seer. 

Let beauty shine as now — 

As at the earliest birth, 
Beauty untranslatable, 

God's Shadow on the Earth! 




R. L. 



16 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



gfcJjool Qotes; 



For the last three summers the Department of National Defence has, during part 
of the month of July, conducted here a School for Senior Militia Officers. It will be 
recalled by most of our readers that two years ago the Officers attending this course 
presented us with a handsome challenge cup for boxing; and that the portraits of the 
King and Queen, that hang above the platform in the Assembly Hall, are the gift of those 
who attended the School last year. The Officers present this summer, following the 
generous example of their predecessors in providing a memento of their visit to Lennox- 
ville, have promised us a clock, which it is hoped will be in position when the Lent Term 
begins. 

Mrs. George R. Hooper has promised to endow a prize for Mathematics in the 
Sixth Form. This will be known as the George R. Hooper Prize. This year Mrs. Hooper 
gave a special prize (Liddell and Scott's Greek Lexicon and Smith's Classical Dictionary) 
to the "Dux" of the School. 

Mrs. Harcourt Smith again promises a prize for the Sports in June. Her kind gift 
of two cups, as first and second prizes for the Cross-Country Race last June, reached us 
too late to be acknowledged in our summer number. 

Our thanks are due also to Mrs. J. P. Black, for again providing a prize for Natural 
Science in the Sixth Form. 

From our old friend Mr. C. C. Kay, of New York, we gratefully acknowledge two 
Prizes for Drawing (for the Upper and Preparatory Schools) and a gift of apples for the 
Hallow-e'en festivities in the Prep. 

The Directors undertook personally to defray the expenses of the trip, in case a 
match were arranged in Montreal with the winners of the Senior School Football League 
of that city. Though the trip did not materialize, the winners of the League being unable 
to play us either here or in Montreal, we very much appreciate this kind offer. 

From Mr. and Mrs. H. S. McGreevy and from Mr. and Mrs. W. G. E. Aird we 
gratefully acknowledge gifts of fruit. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



17 



The B.C.S. Mazagine Staff wishes to thank Mrs. A. E. Ogilvie and Mrs. H. B. Mac- 
Dougall for their constant and practical interest in the Magazine. 




.A.A.A. CRICKET TEAM VS. B.C.S. AT LENNOXVILLE. 



To the "address of" last year's toilers now at McGill and R.M.C.:— 

"B.C.S." 

Yours is an extremely well edited Magazine. Every department seems to be on 
an equally developed basis, and the make-up of B.C.S. is very attractive. May we 
compliment you on your numerous and attractive photographs. You write exceedingly 
interesting accounts of your school life. Next year we hope to see an adequate and 
extensive Exchange Department. 

THE HIGH SCHOOL OF QUEBEC ANNUAL^ 

"B.C.S." 

One of our best Exchanges.— THE WINDSORIAN. 

Bishop's College School, Lennoxville, P.Q. 

Well illustrated and nicely arranged. You are to be congratulated on your work. 

"BLUE AND WHITE," Rothesay Collegiate School. 



18 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



AN OLD BOY 
TO HIS NEW KID DAYS 

Ah me! to live the old days 

over ! 
When I was a Prefect in embryo, 
No happier heart the broad skies 

rover ! 

I hunted for nests of partridge and 

plover 
I knew where the sweetest 

strawberries grow, 
Ah me! to live the old days over! 

I was a New Kid, yon my slave- 
drover 

Gave me a leg-up, a smile, and oh! 

No happier heart the broad skies 
cover ! 

You may laud the life of the merry 

rover, 
Give me my Colours to win, heigh-ho! 
Ah me! to live the old days over! 

Oh! to live with you the old days 

over ! 
If back to it all I could only go, 
No happier heart the broad skies 

cover. 

Mid rustic huts my dreams still 

hover 
With Cedar-wood fires that charmed 

us so, 
Ah me! to live the old days over. 

If a fairy ivould grant me one wish craved 

of her, 
What should I ask ? Oh! well I 

know ! 
All me! to live the old days over, 
No happier heart the broad skies 

cover ! 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



19 



VALETE 

W. McG. Mukkav J- R- Colby 

C R. G. Short •'• G- Neill 

J. H. Patton H. H. Smith 

C. Dobell W. .1. W. Smith 

C. D. G. Johnston C. Rankin 

E. Rocksborough-Smith E. N. Sangster 
K. S. Grant H. G. Greig 
J. L. Rankin H. L. Hall 

E. W. MacNeill 

SALVETE 

Fourth Form 

W. S. Aird W. J. Johnston 

F. H. Baldwin R. R- McLernon 

J. ("!. McEntyre 

Third Form A. 

E. F. H. Boothroyd S. F. Hubbard 
W. Clarke G. W. Hess 
P. W. Davis G. M. Luther 
D. S. Gurd P- L. MacDougall 

J. R. Sare 

Third Form B. 

G. D. Clarke G V. Harshaw 
W. F. S. Carter H. T. Langston 

F. N. Dale D. M. Rankin 
H. Doheny G. A. Read 
R. B. Duncan .T. A. Riddell 

J. J. Walker 

Preparatory 

D. Doheny P. McEntyre 

J. W. Duncan R. Moncel 

A. C. Gilmore H. J. Shepparcl 




20 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



©ubble* 



Fairy "tails" from Montreal and Ottawa. 

Logic Q. — If the master and his opponent in an argument agree in words but not 
in thoughts determine their mood. 

Montgomery (in debate) :— If I had a million dollars I would build an ice house 
in the Country." 

I do not find it easy to sit down. — Riddell. 

I have to walk delicately like old Agag. — 

Walker. 

EPILAUGHS 

Here lies the body of "Riley" Hern, 
Thought Nitric Acid wouldn't burn. 

Here lie the bones of Oliver Hocking, 

A bomb was put in his Christmas stocking. 

Here lies the body of Donald Markey, 
He thought he'd try to box with Sharkey. 

Here lie the bones of little Paul Sise, 
Playing with dynamite wasn't so nice. 

Here lies the body of William Carter, 
Thought the accelerator was the starter. 

MUSIC BOXES 

Squeak, squeak, squeak! 

All the live long day, 
Wonderful in workmanship 

Marvellous in play! 

I'd smash you all to pieces 

Dear instrument o'mine, 
Could I hear Patti's song again 

or Clara Butt's divine! 

R. L. 

Lucky Strike: — 

The CAMELS are coming, hooroo! hurrah! 
"That were a good one." 



,.„ T „.-,,-, r^.TTAAT i\/r ATI A7TNTT?. 21 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



B. C. S. 

When you are very old, in a quiet room 

Where evening comes; and I am wandering 

'Neath the quiet skies. 

This magazine you'll take and with a dewy eye, 

In the shadows, read the browning page. 

Turning over each beloved leaf. 

While ghosts of days like bells at vespers 

Will softly come in revery, 
And Caliph's swinging memory's censers 

With perfumes all from Araby. 

Then you will dream of loves forgotten, 

Dear little loves of long ago; 
And memory will be new-begotten 

Clean days and fair the page will show. 

You were a king and servants bended, 

In dolce far niente days; 
We staged the future, Muses tended, 

We played the Game and won the bays. 

Again you'll play those matches over, 
When life runs dry that now runs rare ; 

And prize then like a treasure-trover, 
What you did do, what you did dare. 

Though college days were fame's predictor; 

Can fickle, world's applause compare 
With that your school pals gave the victor, 

So hearty, free and debonair! 

When shouts of cheering praised the winners 

You were a trier in your place ; 
Perhaps not brilliant as beginners, 

A quitter, never, in the race. 

Old loves, old hates are long forgotten, 
But you will live this page once more, 

Ere lovely lads are dead and rotten, 
And meet old pals from days of yore. 

Long shadows fall at eve's declining; 

These days will gild the page with gold. 
Clean days will silver dark cloud's lining 

And live, when you are very old. 



22 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 






'Ot.sl'.- ,;' , 




BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



23 




jiwifiG 

SOCIETY 




A meeting of the B.C.S. Debating Society was held on November 12th. The sub- 
ject was:— "That this Society is of the opinion that it is foolhardy to attempt to fly across 
the Atlantic at the present stage of aviation." 

'Gillespie opened for the affirmative and in a comprehensive speech pointed out 
that, through vain attempts to fly across the Atlantic, aviation had lost many excellent 
aviators who might have done much to improve it. He said that Lindbergh was particular- 
ly favoured as he had perfect weather and his engine ran smoothly. He thought that 
Byrd's flight was the most remarkable as he encountered very bad weather and paid more 
attention to the scientific aspect. "For women to try," he said, "is ridiculous." 

Coristine I then opened for the negative. He pointed out that aviation would do 
much to stop war as it would bring nations into closer touch with one another and be a 
powerful weapon for the League in subduing any troublesome country such as Russia. 
He said that the aviators who died, died for Science. He also pointed out that those 
who were lost flew in one-passenger, single-engine planes unsuited for long flights while 
Byrd had a party with him and several engines. Many shrewd American financiers 
were backing aviation, such as Levine, who was floating a company to maintain a service 
of fifty-passenger aeroplanes across the Atlantic. He remarked that it would be much 
healthier to travel by flying than to motor along dusty roads. 

Markey in speaking for the affirmative began by drawing attention to the fact that 
many brave men like the two Frenchmen, Nungesser and Coli, lost their lives. He stated 
that he did not think it advanced aviation enough to balance the deaths of so many people. 
If there was to be a trans-Atlantic service, he said, there would have to be bases for the 
aeroplanes to land upon. He concluded by saying that most trans-Atlantic flyers per- 
formed this feat chiefly for the sake of publicity. 

Drury II continued for the negative. He began by refuting Markey's statement 
that all who tried to fly across the Atlantic were merely seeking publicity. He pointed 
out Lindbergh as one of the most modest men who had ever lived. He said that the 
French Government appeared woman-like in stopping officers of the French Air Force 
from attempting to fly across. 

Ogilvie (affirmative) was of the opinion that it was fool-hardy to fly across the ocean. 
In the first place the weather conditions such as wind, cold, and fog were all dangerous 
hazards. Lindbergh did not do it for publicity's sake, but most of the others who sue- 



24 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



ceeded were now making all they could out of it. He considered that it would be very 
difficult for a trans-Atlantic service to be started as people would not be willing to risk 
their lives, and any mail that was sent ran a big risk of being lost. 

Kenny spoke next for the Negative and brought up many excellent points. He prais- 
ed the unselfishness and generosit3' of those who risked their lives in flying across the 
Atlantic for the sake of Science. He said that the air was only being conquered as the 
ocean was conquered, with the loss of a certain number of lives. He pointed out the 
increased speed with which passengers and mail could be conveyed across the Atlantic 
by air. "The aviators who flew across the Atlantic," he said, "will be regarded in the 
future as the pioneers of aviation and as some of the world's greatest heroes." 

Kennedy took the instance of Nungesser and Cob and stated that Nungesser had 
not been popular in Paris and only flew the ocean in order to become a hero. He con- 
sidered it unnecessary to fly the ocean at the present time as other means of conveyance 
were more comfortable, though slower, and very much safer. He concluded by saying 
that if they wanted to test an aeroplane's endurance "they could go up and fly round and 
round a fieldl" 

Patton II in an excellent maiden pointed out that although 28 people had been killed 
flying across the ocean, many more were killed by automobiles. In future flying would 
be quite common and it would be safe to fly across the Atlantic. 

Sise also made an excellent maiden speech. He said if people insisted on flying 
over the ocean they should most certainly do it in seaplanes or flying boats, for if they 
had to land in the middle of the sea they would probably be able to stay on the water 
much longer than if they used land apparatus. Some system should lie invented to 
overcome weather conditions and thus make it safer for the ocean to be spanned. 

Drury I, continuing for the negative, pointed out that if no one ever attempted 
to fly across the ocean, aviation would not make much progress. "Columbus and the 
explorers," he said, "did not worry about risks." 

"The things that haven't been done before, 
Those are the things to try; 
Columbus dreamed of an unknown shore, 
At the rim of the far-flung sky." 

He said that it was never fool-hardy to risk dying for science, and that a fool-hardy 
thing was always done for publicity. As an example of a foolhardy action he instanced 
swimming the channel. "Everyone regards aviation as the future method of travel," 
he said, "and in years to come I hope to see aeroplanes flying to Europe, Asia and the 
Southern Hemisphere." He maintained that it was never fool-harcly to be brave, and 
that great bravery was required to fly such long distances. He declared that it had to 
be done several times, for if Columbus had only sailed across the Atlantic once it would 
not have done much good and we might not be living where we are today. 

Montgomery, a new member and officer of the Society, most certainly made the 
outstanding maiden speech. He started by asking what was the sense of flying the 
ocean if the planes had to be carried back by ship as was always the case, for the pre- 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 25 



vailing west winds make it very hard to fly the opposite way. Alcock and Brown and 
Lindbergh did some good in demonstrating that it was possible to get across, but the 
others merely did good to themselves. He also stated that those who were picked up 
were very lucky as it was a great risk. He compared the promoters of these flights 
with the Romans who promised large rewards to men if they went out and fought wild 
beasts. If landing stages were made they would be useless in the case of fog and rough 



seas. 



Millar was the next to speak for the affirmative. He said that if aviation had been 
developed Nungesser and Coli would have been found and others that lost their lives 
flying the Atlantic. He went on to say that as far as news went, cables could carry 
news faster than airplanes and sending letters by air would be risky. He stated that 
Lindbergh's headlights were supplied by his father. 

Howell then spoke for the affirmative and drew attention to the number of fliers 
who were lost and never heard of again. He said that Nungesser was a great loss to 
France. He declared Ruth Elder to be foolhardy and maintained that the flyers were 
only trying to get moving picture contracts like Gertrude Eclerle had done. He said 
that there were too many risks in crossing the Atlantic by air to make it worth while; 
and that Alcock, Brown and Lindbergh were the only aviators to benefit science in the 
least. He refuted two of his opponent's statements, saying that the Atlantic had a 
bottom in all places, and that Nungesser was not at all unpopular in Paris. 

Pierce also made an excellent maiden speech, and though he spoke at the end he 
brought up some good new points. He mentioned some of the people who had been lost 
and sought in vain. These were valuable lives lost and it had cost countries large sums 
of money searching for them. Lindbergh's determination and dauntless courage had been 
his aids in carrying out his ambition. Fuel was another question he brought up— for 
one of the grave dangers was that fuel might run short which would prove fatal. 

The motion was put to the vote and was carried. The House then proceeded to 

T TVT c 
private business. z/tZY, 

G.H.M. 



1 



A meeting of the B.C.S. Debating Society was held on November 19th, at 7.30 
o'clock, in the Senior Library. The subject for debate was:— "That this Society is of 
the opinion that the Province of Quebec is superior to any other Province in the Dominion 
of Canada." 

Kenny made an excellent speech as opener for the affirmative. He stated that the 
largest city, the commercial centre of Canada— Montreal— was in the Province of Quebec, 
and that Montreal was where the Canadian Pacific and Canadian National Railways 
have their work shops. Next, he took the City of Quebec, which has, as he pointed out, 
such a wonderful port. This Province, from his point of view, boasts the best college in 
the Dominion— McGill (cheers). "Sports are the best in the Dominion," he continued, 



26 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



"The Montreal Maroons are well on their way to winning the championship, and we will 
soon see a baseball park installed at Montreal." He concluded his speech by saying 
that the scenery of the Province was more beautiful than any other; the Saguenay and 
the Gaspe Coast being good examples. 

Coristine I, opening for the negative, began his speech by contrasting Montreal 
with other Canadian cities. He pointed out many instances of poor sanitation and bad 
street lighting which had been brought forward by the newspapers. He stated that the 
water deal and recent typhoid epidemic were both examples of civic bad management- 
He continued by saying that a small opposition, like that in this Province, was bad for 
Government; and that once during the war, soldiers who were sent to Riviere du Loup 
to enforce conscription were pelted with stones, while many of the male inhabitants took 
to the woods, which, he said, was a very bad shew of patriotism. 

Ogilvie, an eloquent debater, made a stirring speech upholding the affirmative. 
Having lived in the Province of Quebec all his life, he thinks it is the finest one in the 
Dominion. He said that Ontario followed Quebec in everything, taking as examples the 
Liquor Commission, and the Educational System. Montreal, in his opinion, has the 
greatest opportunities in business, being the biggest grain shipping port in the world. 
He thought Toronto very puritanical because one is not allowed to play tennis there on 
Sunday. He refuted Mr. Coristine's statement, saying that the lighting system and 
tram car service of Montreal were the best in Canada. He pointed out to our worthy 
Poet Laureate with reference to the typhoid in Montreal that Ottawa has now an epidemic 
of smallpox, and concerning the speed limit of this Province, he knew for a fact that it 
was thirty-five miles an hour in the country. 

Drury II, in an excellent speech, upheld the negative. He pointed out how the 
world's largest annual exhibition was held in Toronto, and said that that city, although 
founded later than Montreal, would soon have a larger population. He also stated that 
it had more playgrounds and parks than Montreal. In refuting Kenny's assertion about 
the University, he said that Varsity had a larger attendance than McGill, while R.M.C. 
and Queen's, the other principal colleges of the East, were both in Ontario. He con- 
cluded with the statement that many Quebec boys received their education in other 
Provinces. 

Si.se, a new and welcome member of the Society, continued for the affirmative. 
He stated that Quebec was the greatest lumber Province, and that there were great re- 
sources in minerals. Numerous water supplies in the Province could, and would, be 
developed in a few years. Fishing on the shores of the St. Lawrence was excellent, and 
no salmon could compare with those from Gaspe, he maintained. He shewed that McGill 
had the best faculty of Medicine, next to John Hopkins' University, in America. 

Howell, speaking against the motion, drew attention to the fact that 95% of the 
world's nickel was produced in Ontario, and that the Niagara Peninsula was the best 
agricultural and fruit growing section of the Dominion. "Apart from Montreal," he 
said, "there are no cities worthy of note in Quebec; the capital is nothing but a make- 
shift." He stated that great water-power was developed at Niagara, and concluded 
by remarking that the theatres of Toronto were superior to those of Montreal. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 27 



Montgomery made one of the best speeches of the evening. He said that Quebec 
had great mineral resources and that the gold mines in Northern Quebec were the best 
in Canada, also that Quebec was rich in marble quarries. In his opinion the best fishing 
and hunting were to be found in this Province, and the scenery in the Laurentians is 
marvellous. Refuting Mr. Howell's statement concerning amusement parks, he said 
that Mount Royal, Belmont and Dominion Parks were better than any in Toronto. 
With regard to speeding in this Province, he said that the Hon. Mr. Perron is noteworthy 
for his efficiency in stopping speeding. "Speeding," he concluded, "is a danger to the 
occupants of the car and a menace to pedestrians." 

Gillespie, upholding the negative, took as an example the scenery in the Rockies 
contrasted with that of Quebec, and said that the prairie provinces, with their great 
wheat crop, brought large revenue to Canada, while in this Province the income from 
agriculture was comparatively small. He thought it unjust of the Provincial authorities 
to take driving licenses away for speeeding, and cited the Laurier Theatre fire as an 
example of slackness on the part of the civic authorities. "Montreal," he said, "has a 
reputation for immorality." 

Markey, speaking near the end of the debate, brought up old points with new force. 
The management of the Liquor Commission in Quebec, in his opinion, is better than in 
any other Province. He refuted one of his opponents' assertion saying that the dairy 
from which the typhoid epidemic came was not a principal one. McGill is raising its 
requirements for entrance and therefore more students wish to enter McGill than Varsity, 
he argued. He pointed out that Quebec excelled in golfers and skiers, and also that this 
Province has the best highways. 

Millar, continuing for the negative, drew attention to the great amount of minerals 
and manufactured products which were imported into Quebec from other Provinces. 
He said that the buildings of Toronto were more modern and better built than those of 
Montreal, and that the largest grain elevators in the world were at Port Arthur. He 
said that Toronto was the first city to get moving pictures and plays from the United 
States, and remarked on the Abbe Delorme case as a miscarriage of justice. He also 
gave an instance of the inefficiency of the Westmount Fire Dept. 

Pierce, for the affirmative, said that the St. Lawrence carries all kinds of through 
transport to the Atlantic; that it's beautiful scenery annually attracts many tourists; 
and that it also supplies Quebec and Montreal with light and power. Quebec Liquor 
Commission, in his opinion, is the best in Canada, because all profits go to make and 
repair government roads. In conclusion he asserted that tram car services of Montreal 
are far superior to those of Toronto. 

Drury I, concluding for the negative, considered the character of the majority of 
Quebec farmers in comparison with those in his own Province, saying that in Ontario 
the farms were better kept and less work was done by the women of the family. He said 
that the people of Quebec were unprogressive and made poor business men; that in Tor- 
onto, with a large English element, arts and literature were more encouraged than in 
Montreal. He drew attention to the salt mines at Windsor, Ont., and the wheat fields 
of the prairies as sources of great prosperity. 



28 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Kennedy closed the debate with an impromptu speech for the affirmative, and said 
that the tourist traffic to Quebec was greater than to any other Province, and in refuting 
some of his opponents' points said that low speed laws and censorship of the theatres 
were essential in a well run community. 

Thirteen members having spoken, the House divided and the count shewed the 
motion to be carried by eight votes to five. H. I. K. 

I. 0. 



t 



A meeting of the B.C.S. Debating Society was held on Saturday, November 26th 1 
The subject for debate was: — "Thai this Society is of the opinion that the legitimate drama 
is superior to the cinema." 

Kenny opened for the affirmative and performed his duty admirably. He stated 
in the first place that it was a higher and better educated class of people that went to 
see drama. On the stage the theme made more impression, as things appear more real 
when you actually hear people speak. He continued by saying that most of the actors 
and actresses in drama were a more intelligent class and that there was more required 
of actors in a play than in a picture as the parts must be learned to perfection. He 
concluded by saying that Shakespeare, who is considered the greatest playwright, could 
not be adequately represented on the screen. 

Corisline I opened for the negative and in a comprehensive speech pointed out that 
while the price of seeing a moving picture was low enough to allow all classes to go, it was 
expensive to see a good play. He said that, if the average man watching a moving picture 
was not very intelligent, the film companies were doing their best to rectify this by shew- 
ing many educational films, such as the Pathe News which gives valuable information 
on current events. In his opinion the movies kept many people out of mischief, as it 
gave them an enjoyable method of spending their time — it being possible to attend 
pictures in the afternoon and evening and even, in New York, in the morning. The 
most beautiful women could be seen on the screen, as they were attracted from the stage 
by the higher salaries, increased popularity and larger outlook. He pointed out that the 
Laurier Palace disaster might just as well have occurred during a play. He concluded 
by saying that the lack of speaking was an advantage, as actors from all parts of the 
world could act for the moving pictures. 

Kennedy was the next speaker for the affirmative. The outstanding point he 
brought up was that more personality was needed for people to act on the stage than on 
the screen. He also stated that people in most cases had to be better looking to act in 
drama on account of the closer scrutiny of the audience. "Movies are not so real," he 
said, "and therefore less impressive." He went on to say that comedy on the stage was 
far more amusing than in the pictures. He maintained that Gladys Cooper was far 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 29 



better looking than anyone in Hollywood. In big cities people always go to plays before 
they go to the picture houses. 

* Drury II, continuing for the negative, said that it was only the price which debarred 
poor people from seeing plays; they had quite enough intelligence to understand them. 
He thought, however, that while Shakespeare's plays were all very well for King Arthur's 
times (sic) there was not enough action in them for the present day. He said that pic- 
tures like "The Four Horsemen" and "Beau Geste" were superior to Earl Carrol's 
Vanities. He pointed out that great ability was needed in acting for the movies, not 
merely good looks. He said that although seats in the gallery were cheap, plays could 
not be heard from there, but pictures could easily be seen. 

Montgomery kept up the good standard of his speaking and made a very concise and 
clear speech. In the movies there is generally no colour, and what colour there sometimes 
is, blurs things. The colour on the stage always makes an impression. Singing, which 
is'impossible to have on the screen, is very beautiful in most cases. He rightly said that 
movies do not last nearly as long as plays or even as long as Musical Comedies like 
Gilbert & Sullivan's. Movies cater for the less intelligent classes more than for the 
upper classes. He ended by stating that the movies did not cultivate the finer feelings 
and imagination. 

Sise, in a very clear speech, claimed that it was the upper class people, who seldom 
went to the moving pictures, who criticised them. He stated that many people could 
not act on the stage because of stage fright but were quite at ease acting for the screen. 
He pointed out that John Barrymore had left the stage for the screen and said that 
war and sea pictures could not be given on the stage. He shewed that "The Big Parade" 
had a run of two years, and asserted that many theatres were like the Laurier Palace. 
Markey upheld the affirmative side of the question. He first considered the finer 
arts of acting and said that they were brought out much more on the stage than on the 
screen. "Movies," he continued, "go out of existence quicker than plays or even musical 
comedies. Children of the lower classes go to movies and absorb pernicious ideas that 
may affect them throughout their lives. Stories written in books are in most cases first 
represented on the stage and then on the screen." 

Ogilvie pointed out that the screen supplies entertainment for the classes who could 
neither afford nor understand the legitimate drama. He thought that some pictures 
had a real historic value. He argued that while a play could have, at most, only about 
a dozen different settings, a moving picture might have any number. "Drama," he said 
"has to be rehearsed just as much as a screen play; and even if moving pictures are made 
chiefly for people of lower intelligence, they have as much right to be entertained as any- 
one else." With regard to the fact that there was no speaking in Movies, he said that 
the phono-play might be developed. He concluded by saying that screen actors had 
less strain than stage actors, as they did not have to travel or to act as much. 

Millar opposed the negative side. He commenced his speech by saying that people 
go into the movies chiefly for the money they get out of it, but that people go on the stage 
for the love of it and with the idea of shewing real talent. He also said that the persons' 
real talents are shewn up much more on the stage and there is often a more impressive 



30 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 

scene to display them. Movies are open on Sundays and this has a bad influence on 
children. Young people often get immoral ideas from moving pictures which might 
lead them on to commit a crime. 

Cleghorn, in his first speech this year, pointed out that movies must be more popular 
as more people go to them and there are more theatres for showing them. "The movies," 
he said, "are more natural, as there are no artificial lights or paper trees." He mentioned 
that the Pathe News was educational and that war and sea pictures could not be acted 
on the stage. He argued that while some theatres were a menace to the younger genera- 
tion, all movies in Quebec were well censored. While less people would have attended 
the Laurier Theatre if a play had been shewn, he thought that that was rather an argu- 
ment in favour of moving pictures. 

Ptttton I found that there were not very many points left for him to discuss. He 
said that big cities like New York had more play-houses than picture-houses, and there- 
fore plays must draw more than movies. The applause an actor gets when he is on the 
stage gives him encouragement and is a great help in acting. He stated that Rudolph 
Valentino had once said that he preferred the stage to the screen as the acting was given 
more encouragement and applause was a real asset. 

Drury I, in his best speech this season, said that the Follies and Broadway were as 
vulgar as any movie, and they dealt with things that only Shakespeare should meddle 
with. "All small towns," he said, "have a moving picture house to which people can go 
and see how other people live." He stated that moving picture houses were now fire-proof, 
and gave instances of greater disasters than the Laurier Palace fire which had occurred 
in play-houses. He said that hills, trees, mountains and rivers could be shewn on the 
screen but not on the stage. In conclusion he pointed out that many great actors left 
the stage for the screen, attracted by the increased salary and popularity, and the fact 
that they could always return to the stage and be more popular than ever. 

Pierce, in an impressive speech for the affirmative, began by saying that one great 
advantage of the spoken drama was the fact that you hear real voices, while you have to 
read the story from the screen in the "Movies." The plot on the screen is often revealed 
before the picture is far under way, but on the stage one must use one's imagination more. 
The scenery is also a great asset to the stage. He stated that pictures are bad for the eyes 
and do not improve the mind. 

Howell was the next speaker for the affirmative. Though he spoke near the end of the 
debate he found some fresh points. He maintained that talented people waste their 
time if they go to the pictures, for they would shew up much better on the stage. Im- 
possible things are shewn on the screen and one gets a far more life-like impression from 
a play. He said that in New York there are far more musical comedies and plays than 
good moving pictures. Lastly he stated that people get far more thrill out of a mystery 
play acted on the stage than otherwise. 

Gillespie concluded for the affirmative ami in an impromptu speech pointed out that 
movies were for one class of people and the drama for another. "Personally," he said 
"I get more enjoyment from the drama." He said that censorship spoils many movies 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 31 



as it makes them difficult to follow. He concluded that the music on the stage made an 
appeal to music lovers. 

The motion was put to the House and, on a division, it was shown that the motion 
was carried by 9 to 6. 

The House then proceeded to private business. G. H. M., T. M. G. 



A meeting of the B.C.S.D.S. was held in the Senior Library on Saturday, December 
3rd Mr Young in the chair. At the beginning of the Debate a member suggested that 
a "Hat Night" would be preferable to the subject chosen: "Professionalism in Sports 
is to be deplored." A vote was taken and a "Hat Night" was decided upon. 

Drury II opening the debate, drew "Day Schools vs. Boarding Schools." In sup- 
porting boarding schools he pointed out how much better it was for a boy's character to 
live away from home, how he formed closer friendships by consorting with boys con- 
stantly and how he became more independent through living without family indulgence. 
"A boarding school", he said, "gives a boy a better start in life, taking all self-pity out 
of him; in a boarding school the Debating and Dramatic Societies both do their share m 
educating the growing boy." 

Millar speaking next, drew "The European Viewpoint vs. the American." He re- 
marked that the majority of Central European countries are backward, having poor 
roads and unsanitary houses, while the nations on this continent are further advanced. 
He continued by pointing out that a great number of people in Europe were uneducated, 
while there were comparatively few uneducated in America. Saying a few words m 
favour of Europeans, he pointed out that in England more care is taken m manufacture, 
while in the United States mass production is chiefly sought for. 

Coristine I drew from the hat "Dual Education," and said that personally he did not 
know much about it, never having had any experience of it himself. He said that he 
thought co-education was not good for the youthful temperament of modern girls and boys, 
and that very strict discipline was necessary. "There would be further complications 
between Masters and Mistresses," he asserted, "as these would also come into close 
contact." He stated that dual education was more suitable for colleges than schools _ 
^Montgomery, in an amusing speech, dealt with the subject: " If I had a million dollars ." 
He started by saying that he would not like to get it in a spectacular fashion, as the 
publicity and the number of reporters would become a positive nuisance. He pointed 
out that it was a bad thing to become lazy, and provided his job was not unpleasant, he 
said that he would continue it; that he would invest his fortune in some reliable stocks, 
and with the interest obtained would buy a nice house in the country, with some live 



32 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 

stock. He thought it was very unwise to squander money quickly, but that he would 
give freely to sensible charities, and enlarge his stamp collection, which, he said, was 
his hobby. 

Read I in speaking on the subject: "City vs. Country Life," brought up many points 
in favour of both sides. He said that the city was more convenient for parents with 
children to be educated, owing to the great number of public and high schools in the 
neighbourhood; and that the water and lighting systems made life much more comfort- 
able. He said that in the realm of sport both places had their advantages, exhibition 
games being played in the city, while in the country swimming and fishing were very 
enjoyable. He pointed to the country as being more healthy, and a better place to keep 
animals; while the suburbs, he said, were spots where the enjoyments of both places 
could be combined. 

Howell drew the subject: "McGill vs. R.M.C." In supporting both sides of the 
question he said that the Royal Military College developed a man physically and im- 
proved his health, giving his body an upright carriage. He said that the advantages of 
the two colleges could be combined by spending two years at Kingston and then going 
into Third Year McGill. "McGill," he continued, "has an excellent medical course, and 
is considered by some to be the best university in the Dominion." 

Cowans, in a maiden speech, debated on the subject: "A Cadet Corps is essential to 
every school." He pointed out how being in a cadet corps taught boys to obey and give 
commands, and made them neat in their clothing, and stopped them from "slouching 
about." He pointed out how useful a cadet corps training was to R.M.C. candidates. 
"If a school cadet corps wins a shield it is a mark in favour of those boys in the corps," 
he said. 

Kennedy drew as a subject: "If I were a Beggar." He began his speech by saying 
that if he were a beggar he would spend most of his time in the open, studying nature. 
He remarked how cheerful beggars always are, citing the poor entertainers who amuse 
London theatre queues. He thought that beggars were lucky in not having money mat- 
ters to worry about and being able to live by charity. 

Kenny drew "Fagging is essential in the making of a man." He said that, although 
it was not really essential to the making of a man, it was a great asset to him in after 
years if he had fagged at school. Boys are generally cheeky and impudent when they 
come to school, but fagging takes this out of them; if there were no fagging, boys would 
be impertinent all their lives. "This discipline is very useful to a boy in his future 
life," he concluded. 

Pierce picked from the hat "// / were King." He stated that he certainly would 
not be a hermit and sit all day upon his throne, but would have a glorious time. Also 
he would see that the poor had good treatment, and he would try, as far as possible, to 
keep down revolutions. He would have a standing army and navy and pay no attention 
whatsoever to disarmament. In conclusion he said that he would not go to functions 
held in his honour, and would ignore these affairs as much as possible. 

Markey drew "Canada will one day join the U.S.A." In his opinion Canada would 
never join the States. For one reason, Cahada, being thickly populated with British 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 33 



stock, is loyal to the Mother Country. Another reason was that there was great ill- 
feeling towards the U.S.A. because of the quarrel over the Great Lakes. He pointed 
out that Canada and the United States are very differently governed, and so they could 
not possibly join. 

Ogilvie drew from the hat "Ancients vs. Moderns." He thought Moderns far superior 
in every way. Firstly, he took the point of sanitation, which is far better now than in 
the olden days. On 'account of bad sanitation, plagues used to spread very quickly. 
On the battle field, if anyone was wounded, that was usually the end of him; whereas 
now we have capable nurses and doctors to tend the wounded. Next he took transporta- 
tion; in ancient times boats were very inefficient, but now one can travel in luxury with 
very little danger. Then he said that the invention of printing was far superior to the 
scribe method, and that modern writers are much better than such ancient authors as 
Homer and Cicero. Finally, kings used to be very despotic, which is injurious to a 
country. 

Rankin I, in an excellent maiden, debated the subject: "Army vs. Nary." The 
Navy, in his opinion, is essential to a country. "In wartime, if there was no navy," he 
said," ''the war would be a farce." The army could not possibly get any food, if on an 
island, without a navy. He pointed out, however, that countries like Switzerland, that- 
had no water frontage, did not really need a navy. 

Sise dived deep into the hat and produced "Air vs. Other Modes of Travel." Air, 
he thought, has a great future, and aeroplanes are less dangerous than motors. Also 
aeroplanes did a great deal in winning the war for Great Britain and her allies. Air mail 
services will be much safer, because bandits will not think of holding them up. In his 
opinion submarines are much more dangerous than aeroplanes, because if anything 
goes wrong with them you just sink. 

Patton I spoke next. "One must learn to obey before one is capable of commanding" 
fell to him. He was in favour of this altruism and said that it was proved at school, 
because everybody must be a "new kid" before he can fag. Again, he pointed out that 
at R.M.C. one must go through three years of discipline before one is capable of command- 
ing. 

Drury I began his speech by saying that he would like to help Montgomery to 
spend his million. He drew "Winter sports vs. Summer sports," and said that one would 
not like to do without either of them. Hockey, which is considered the best sport in 
Canada, can only be played in the winter. On the other hand, swimming is generally 
only indulged in out of doors in the summer. Of course, one can play summer games in 
winter, if one cares to go South. He concluded that polo was a summer sport but could 
only be played by the idle rich! 

A vote of censure was passed at this meeting on the Treasurer for his negligence in 
collecting or inability to collect fines. 

The House then adjourned. H.S.K. 

*The Ed's "obiter dictum" is that the scribe must be daft; he considered this one of the most sensible 
speeches of the evening. 



34 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



AT SUNDOWN 

The sun sinks down in a blaze of gold, 

On its never-ending quest; 

And the evening breezes, chill and cold, 

Come rippling over the lake from the west. 

And then the scintillating moon 

Creeps up behind the trees, 

And across the lake comes the call of the loon 

Borne on the soft night breeze. 

Then a screech like that of a maniac. 

From the owl in his eerie perch, 

Nearby in the lofty tamarack 

Amongst the silver birch. 

Whilst now and then from (he gleaming lake, 

As the trout begin to rise 

And leap in the air the white moth to take, 

And triumphant fall back with their prize. 

You can see the splashing water 

And their flashing bodies quiver, 

As they gather for the slaughter 

From bay and pool and river, 

And the air is full of shadows, 

Which flit through the ghostly light 

As the bats play round the willows 

And capture the moths in their flight. 

All this goes on in the solitudes, 

While in smoky city and town 

We, the children of human vicissitudes 

In sordid pleasures drown. 



P. B. CORISTINE (Poet Laureate). 




BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



35 




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•«*=, 



lliru 





On Wednesday, November 16th, the Sixth Form once again proved its superiority 
by defeating in an annual rugby fixture a picked team from the rest of the School, by the 
decisive score of 15-5. As it had been raining for several days previously, the gridiron 
was not in the best of condition, and both teams found the chase of the elusive pigskin 
a hard one. The School opened the scoring in the first period by a touch which was 
unconverted. This was avenged by a short dash by Blinco, bringing the score to 5-5. 
The excitement among the crowd grew intense, and the famous Sixth Form yell was 
heard. continually from a small but determined group of rooters on the side lines. In 
the second period Blinco again scored, after the ball had been carried half the length 
of the field by Sharp. At, this point a diversion was created by a pitched battle on the 
side lines between the supporters of the rival teams, the players themselves, however, 
refrained from taking part. The third period was unmarked by anything except the 
frequent off-sides of the eager Sixth Formers, and the play was for the most part in the 
vicinity of centre field. In the last period Sharp dashed through the opposing team, 
after catching a kick, for a touch. A minute later the whistle blew with the score 15-5 
in favour of the Sixth. 



Sixth 




School 


Simms 


Flying wing 


Davis I 


Drury I 


Half 


Hern 


Coristine I 


ct 


Drury II 


Sharp 


i i 


Millar 


Duggan 


Outside 


Coristine II 


Black 


it 


Kenny 


Blinco 


Middle 


Blaylock 


Fuller 


a 


Rankin I 


Roberts 


Inside 


Baldwin 


Payan I 


a 


Rankin II 


Cleghorn 


Snap 


Patton I 


Read I 


Quarter 


Taylor 


Doucet 


Sub. 


Starke 


Gillespie 


it 





36 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



SIXTH FORM YELL (with apologies to Daudet). 

Ta Ra Ra! 
Ta Ra Ra! 
Tartarin ! Tartarin ! 
Ha Ha Ha! 

Sixth Form, Sixth Form, 
Rah! Rah! Rah! 




September 14th 
September 16th 
October 1st 
October 7th 
October 8th 
October 15th 
October 17th 
October 21st 
October 22nd 
October 22nd 
October 23rd 
October 24th 
October 24th 
October 25th 
October 29th 
November 2nd 
November 6th 



November 
November 
November 
November 
November 
November 
December 
December 
December 



7th 
12th 
14th 
15th 
19th 
26th 

3rd 
17th 
21st 



SCHOOL CALENDAR 

Returned to School. 

First football creases. 

Played practice game with U.B.C. Won 30-0. 

Second team played Lennoxville High School. Won 1-0. 

First team played Stanstead at Lennoxville. Won 15-8. 

First team played Lower Canada College at Lennoxville. Won 15-8. 

Half-holiday for winning L.C.C. game. 

Teams went to Montreal. 

First team played Ashbury in Montreal. Won 31-1. 

Second team played Ashbury 2nd in Montreal. Won 27-3. 

Second team returned from Montreal. 

First team played Westmount High in Montreal. Won 7-0. 

First team returned from Montreal. 

Half-holiday for winning in Montreal. 

First team played Stanstead in Stanstead. Won 35-5. 

First team played Loyola at Lennoxville. Won 12-5. 

School heard that we had won the Governor General's Shield for Cadet 

Corps. 
Thanksgiving Day, First team played Old Boys. Won 16-0. 
First meeting of Debating Society. 
Half-holiday for winning Governor General's Shield. 
Started basketball creases. 
Meeting of Debating Society. 
Meeting of Debating Society 
Meeting of Debating Society. 
Exams start. 
Christmas holidays begin. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



37 



\r. 



QPSPOO 




GO©*? 



®KKI o 



Give a sentence with the words : — 

Howell— "Don't howl so loud." 

Kennedy "Can anybody do this sum?" 

Markey "Mark easy, sir." 

Hern "How can I earn a dollar?" 

Taylor "Did you pull the cat's tail, or not?" 

Breakey "It's time for middle break, eh ?" 

Bo:— "I bet you can't make a limerick with the word banana." 
Mo:— "That's easy." 

There's a guy who's called Bertha Banana, 
Who looks like a marina rana ; 
He has long stringy hair 
And you should hear him swear 
Like a parrot from British Guiana. 

*The sea-frog, or angler fish. 



LA MULE DU PAPE 

On the mule he did find, 

Two legs behind, 

Two legs he did find before. 

Tistet drank all his wine 

And so he did find 

What the two behind were for. 



A. M. H. 



CO 



Jf tfti) Jform line up 



Name 


Nick- 
name 


Ambition 


Probable future 
Occupation 


Weakness 


Pastime 


Favourite Expression 


Blavlock. . . . 


Pete 


To be more sarcastic. . . 


Coal miner 


Mr. M . . . . 


None 










Breakey 


Cal 


Mayor of Breakeyville. . 


Street cleaner in 
Breakevville 




Annoying people. . . 
Reading Gazette. . . 


"Eeki" 








Coristine II . 


Stine 


To be a second Roger 
Hornsbv 


Ice-cleaner at Forum. . 












Drurv II 


Bud 


Small, if any! 


None 




Teasing Ed 










Hern 


Riley 


To be a second Vezina. . 


Teacher 




Sleeping 


"Let's go, gang." 






Hocking 


Stook 


To bicycle across Asia. . . 


Baseball umpire 


Bicycle 


Writing lines 

Working ? ? ? . . . 


"Oowb.1" 








Howell 


Heck 


To clean up Monte Carlo 






"Great fun." 


Kenny 


Buck 


Boxer 


Bouncer 


F R P 


Supplied by same. . 


"What makes you think 
it was me, sir?" 








Kennedy 


Oleo 


To be a second Michael 
Arlen 


Writer of better books. 


Elinor Glyn 


Reading 


"My deah!" 






Marker 


Mo 


To grow thinner 


Taxi-driver 




Reading the Star. . 


"Hope you're enjoying 
yourself.' 








Meakins 




To part his hair 


Mayor of Aberdeen. . . 


His generosity 


Giving away 

money ? 


"Hoot, mon!" 


Montgomery. 


Monty. . . . 


To make a bigger and 
better Greek book 


Greek Philospoher. . . . 


G reek 


Doing Greek 










Ogilvie 


Bean 


To be like Dave 


Porter on the Trans- 


MacKinnon 


Annoying Sise 


"Oh . . , yes!" 






Sise 


Dimples. . . 


President of the Bell 
Telephone. Co 


World famous soprano 
squeaker 


Porridge 


Getting peeved. . . . 


"Beg your pardon, sir." 


Taylor ( 


jordie 


3olf Pro 


Caddie 


Xfew kids in general. . 


Reading the Mo- 
Gill Daily. 


"What's that?" 



a 

w 
W 

o 



o 

tr 1 

r- 1 

Q 
W 

ui 
O 

o 

O 
t" 1 



> 

> 

tSJ 
I — i 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



39 




^ ^^^^^ ^^^^^^^^^^^^3m^SZZ22S22SSSm& 



o 



l_J 



*m 



A STUDY IN "BUTTS" 

One day Mr. Lucky Strike was walking down Turret avenue, on his way to a play 
produced by the Guinea Gold Players. The leading actor was Mr. Johnnie Walker. 
He had also heard that Mrs. Craven A. Winchester was acting in it. It was all 
about the Camel stampede at Yorktown. The stampede held up the State Express, 
and the officials tried to complain to the British Consol, but the Barking Dog from 
Marlboro who was eating Spuds and Gold Flakes stopped them from doing so. The 
scene switched to the Old Gold river. Mr. Philip Morris and Mr. Bogus Slavsky, 
the two Old Chums, were riding their favourite horses, Dunhill and Honeysuckle; 
they met Sweet Caporal, a girl friend of theirs, and asked her where she was going. 
She said, "I am going to see Fatima Capstan, so I cannot go with you" In three years 
Sweet Caporal married Mr. Dunhill and they had a son and daughter called Chester- 
field and Sonia. 

A. R — D. C. 

First Man: — "I saw a man swallow a sword." 

Second Man: — "That's nothing, I saw a man inhale a camel." 

She did not get by with that Correction: 

A boy in a railroad car kept sniffing. Finally a lady said, "Boy, have you a handker- 
chief?" "Yes", replied the boy, "but I never lend it to strangers." 

Johnston: — "Sir, I can't get into my locker." 

Master: — "But you are not supposed to get into your locker." 

Bank Teller: — "I am sorry, madam, but you have overdrawn your account." 
Lady:— "But that's impossible, for I still have half a book of cheques left." 



R. M. 



40 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Twinkle, twinkle, little bell, 
Wake me up for forty — well! 
Left-right, left-right, double march 
When I get back I'm stiff as starch." 

Master: — "And what kind of a suit do you expect to ask for?" 

Pierce: — "Well, sir, I'll just ask for an ordinary day suit." 

Master: — "Of course it would be a day suit. We are not talking about pyjamas." 

Master's Favourite Sayings: 

"Come on now, cut it out." 
"Prep, on the board, Rankin." 
"I'll give you drill, sir!" 
"Twenty minutes every time." 
"Good heavens and earth." 

What We Expect To See in 15 Years: 

Aircl — B.C.S. Chaplain. 

Hadfiekb- In the Fifth Form. 

Johnston — Boxing promoter. 

MacDougall— President of the Montreal Maroons. 

McLernon — Editor of a newspaper. 

McGreevy — Broncho Buster. 

Millar — Acting his age. 

Payan — Station Master at St. Hyacinthe. 

Patton I— Waiting for Hadfield. 

Rankin — Nurmi's only rival. 

Weaver — Selling peanuts. 




"THAT FIRST TEAM FEELING' 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



41 




Ifs 



When the drill bell rings 

And up I leap, 
Turned from my bed 

And a nice quiet sleep; 
I seize my shirt and grab my tie, 

And brush my teeth and almost die. 
Then down the stairs — 

Up to the Gym. — 
Hear roll-call read 

My name's not there. 
So to bed I repair. 

To my nice little cot 
Am I downhearted? 

Certainly not. 

Form IIIA 

Is the best, we say. 
In sports we're ahead 
By a good long way. 
At work we excel, 
All things we do well. 
Now there's no more to say 
So we wish you good-day 
With three cheers for IIIA. 

in IIIA: 

If Aitchison did not get soaked by Mr 

If Clarke did know his French 

If Davis gave up girls 

If Gurd did not fight with Hubbard 

If Hess knew his Latin 

If Hubbard did not argue about Quebec 

If Lynch did not get sore at Mr. . . . 



42 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



If Luther went to Chester for the summer 

If MacDougall knew all the theorems in the book 

If MacKinnon did not do his hair 

If Sare stopped talking about Nova Scotia. 

If Starke did not fool. 

What a dull Form IIIA would be! 

Seen in the papers in 1942 — 

Marriages. Mr. W. T. Lynch, of Sherbrooke, was married today to Miss (censor- 
ed) . . . . , of Suttonton, daughter of the well-known jelly bean manufacturer. The 
service was held in the B.C.S. Chapel at Lennoxville. The Rev. J. R. Sare conducted 
the service, and the best man was Mr. P. Aitchison, M.A., a great friend of the groom. 
Mr. W. S. Patton gave the bride away. The ushers were Messrs. D. MacKinnon, A. 
Starke, P. L. MacDougall, G. M. Luther, D. S. Gurd, S. F. Hubbard and G. W. Hess. 
Capt. Boothroyd and Capt. Davis were unable to attend, as Capt. Boothroyd's pigskin 
chasers were playing Capt. Davis's Shieks in a championship game. After the ceremony 
Mr. and Mrs. Lynch started on a trip round the moon. 

Heard Nearly Every Day in IIIA: 

"Sixty minutes and 15 lines." 

"What's the prep. ?" 

"Who hasn't done the prep. ?" 

"I'll have to give you drill." 

"It hurts me more than it does you." 

"I am getting tired of setting prep, for myself to do." 

"Who missed?" 

"All right, you'll do." 

"Point your pencils while I am out." 

"Now that's very easy." 

What We Expect IIIA to be Doing in 2000 A.D.: 

Aitchison still finding lines for Mr. M . . . . 

Boothroyd captain of U.B.C. football team. 

Clarke I, president of a paper mill. 

Davis II, still breaking bones. 

Gurd, Professor of Maths. 

Hubbard, President of Quebec Swimming & Athletic Ass'n. 

Luther selling Lincolns (perhaps Fords!) 

Lynch printing Latin books. 

MacDougall, professional polo player. 

MacKinnon, manager of Brooklyn Baseball Club. 

Hess, Band Conductor. 

Patton just getting his first Latin sentence wrong. 

Starke making glasses 

Sare, Prime Minister of Nova Scotia. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



43 




H 



What we expect to see old three B'ians. doing in 1942. 

Anderson: — Trap-player in the Salvation Army. 

Carter: — First in command at R.M.C. 

Clarke II : — Trying to make a bigger and better aeroplane. 

Dale: — Running for Premier of Canada. 

Doheny : — Janitor. 

Duncan : — Still sleeping. 

Harshaw: — President of C.P.R. 

Langston: — Artist for Eaton's catalogue. 

Mackay: — In the IVth form. 

McClure: — An author for the school mag. 

Read : — Goalie for the Canadiens. 

Rankin II: — Prefect in the sixth. 

Riddell :— Coaching McGill's First team. 

Walker: — Trying to reduce. 

Everyday Phrases in three B. 

"Wah boy! I'll give you drill." 

"Sixty minutes and fifteen times." 

"Shut up, you idiot! Langston, a hundred minutes, sit down." 

"Ow, you duffer, I'll have to give you dwill." 

"Riddell, where's your prep ? It dropped out of my book, Sir." 



We all want to know when: — 

Anderson will forget to tell us to clean up the room. 
Carter will forget to crack a wise one in class. 
Clarke II will forget to do his prep. 



44 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Dale will stop getting drill. 

Duncan will wake up. 

Doheny will get his own books. 

Harshaw will know the general enunciation of Theorem I. 

Langston will have the right prep. done. 

Macka}' will go into MA. 

McClure will fail to pay attention to his lessons. 

Rankin II will not argue with Mr. S . . . 

Read will do Mr 's prep. 

Riddell will know his History. 
Walker will reach six feet. 

Doheny: — "Have you been to school all your life ?" 
Mackay: — "I don't know, I'm not dead yet." 



Carter :- 
Walker: 



-"Why does rolls remind you of der sun?" 

—"Because dey rises in de yeast and settles down behind de vest.' 




BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 45 



OLD B. C. S. 

// e'er the chance ivill come to me 
I wish for nothing less; 

I'll buck the line with happy glee, 
For the sake of B. C. S. 

If e'er the trumpet peals the call 
For soldiers, well, I guess, 

In a khaki uniform I'll doll 
For the sake of B.C.S. 

If e'er a friend will ask of me 
A boy's school, well, I guess, 

I'd say his boys luould happy be 
At our old B.C.S. 

If e'er I have a will to make, 

In pain I'll die unless 
A good piece of my wealth I stake. 

For my old B.C.S. 



J. N. PIERCE. 



46 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




EXCHANGES 

A very great pleasure dur- 
ing the School Year is the 
constant flow of exchanges 
from Schools everywhere. 
We peruse these with de- 
light and seem to know 
quite a few boys intimately 
whose names we are con- 
stantly meeting in maga- 
zines. Old Boys at different 
Universities, also, tell us 
that many bo3's were not 
strangers to them, on arriv- 
ing there, for the same rea- 
son. The viewpoint of other 
Schools is most interesting 
and the various literary de- 
partments make their ap- 
peal to all. 



Jfflap toe toigf) all tottf) toljom toe exchange a "Jlerrp 3£mas" 
anb a "prigijt anb ?|appp j£eto gear" 




BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



47 



EXCHANGES 



"Acta Ridleiana," Ridley College, Ont. 
"Acta Studentium," Toronto. 
"Albanian," St. Alban's School, Ont, 
"Anvil," Middlesex School, Mass. 
"Argus," Appleby School, Ont, 
"Ashburian," Ashbury College, Ont. 
"Beaver Log," Miss Edgar's School, 

Montreal. 
"Bishop's Strachan's School Magazine," 

Bishop's Strachan School, Ont, 
"Black & Gold," St. John's College, 

School, Man. 
"Black & Red," University School, B.C. 
"Brimmerwrites," Brimmer School, Mass. 
"Blue & White," Rothesay Collegiate 

School, N.B. 
"Campbellian," Campbell College, Ireland 
"Cargilfield Chronicle," Edinburgh, 

Scotland 
"Choate News," Choate School, Conn. 



"Goat," Royal Canadian Dragoons. 
"Golden Rod," Quincy High School, Mass. 
"Haileyburian," Haileybury, England 
"Helliconian," Moulton College, Ont. 
"Hermes." 

"High School of Quebec Annual." 
"Hotchkiss Lit," Lakeville, Conn. 
"Lit," Lawrenceville School, N.J. 
"Liverpool College Magazine," 

England. 
"Loomis Log," Loomis Institute, 

Conn. 
"Lower Canada College Review," Lower 

Canada College, Que. 
"McGill Daily," McGill University. 
"Mitre," University of Lennoxville. 

Moose Jaw Evening Times. 
"Oakwood Oracle," Oakwood College, Ont. 
"Phoenix," Pawling School, N.Y. 
"Orange & Blue," Milton Academy, Mass. 



"College Times," Upper Canada College, "Quebec High School Magazine," Quebec, 

Ont, P-Q- 

"Columbia Jester," Columbia University, "The Rossalian," Rossal School, Fleetwood. 
N.Y. "Royal Military College Review," Kingston, 

"Felstedian," Felsted College, England. Ont. 

"The Fettesian," Fettes College, Edinburgh "Salt Shaker," Saskatoon, Sask. 

"S.H.S.", St. Helen's School, Que. 

"St. Andrew's Review," St. Andrews College, Ont. 

"Stanstead College," Stanstead, Que. 

"Stonyhurst Magazine," Stonyhurst College, England. 

"Taft Oracle," 

"Technique," Technical Institute, Montreal. 

"Tripod," Roxbury Latin School, Mass. 

"Twig," University of Toronto Schools, Ont. 

"Western Canada College Review," Western Canada College, Ont. 

"Western University Gazette," University of Western Ontario. 

"Vox Lycei," Ottawa Collegiate Institute, Ont. 

"The Vulcan,'" Central Technical School, Toronto. 

"Windsorian," King's College School, N.S. 

"Wolf Howl," Sudbury Tech., Ont. 

"The Collegiate," Sarnia, Ont. 

"The Branksome Slogan," Branksome Hall, Ont. 

"Trafalgar Echoes," Trafalgar Institute, Montreal. 



48 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



C^lmnfesigtbmg O^P 



ANNUAL PRIZE DISTRIBUTION WAS HELD AT B.C.S. 

School Team Scored Victory Over Old Boys.— Large Number of 

Visitors Present. 

(From the Sherbrooke Daily Record) 

In spite of the recent heavy rains and consequent floods which have rendered travel- 
ling; conditions so uncertain, a large number of visitors attended the annual prize dis- 
tribution at Bishop's College School, Lennoxville, on Monday. Old Boys, friends and 
parents of the present school boys began to arrive at Lennoxville as early as Saturday, 
and many attended the School Chapel services on Sunday. 

Monday's programme began with a football match between the present school 
team and a team composed of Old Boys. This was played in the morning on the school 
field. The result was a victory for the present boys by 16 points to 0. Many Old Boys 
around whom school tradition has been built up were present, and either took part in 
the game or cheered their team from the side lines. This game is an annual institution, 
and it is always hard to forecast the result, for it depends both on the calibre of the school 
team for the year and the quality of opposition which the Old Boys can present. 

Smith, Rankin, Campbell, Johnston, Luther, Black, Baker, McGreevy, Hall, McCrea, 
Auld, Acer, O'Meara and Campbell represented the Old Boys, and the regular School 
team composed of Kenny, Fuller, Blinco, Hern, Cleghorn, Payan, Sharp, Duggan, Black, 
Drury, Hadfield, Read, Roberts, Taylor and Drury II was the successful opposition. 

Luncheon was served in the Ross Dining Hall, after which the distribution of prizes 
took place in the Assembly Hall. Major H. S. McGreevy, who presided, read letters 
from Mr. Grant Hall and Mr. Hartland McDougall apologizing for their unavoidable 
absence. The following letter from Colonel Keener, District Cadet Officer, was also 
read : — 

To the Headmaster, Bishop's College School: — 

"I am directed to advise you that Bishop's College School Cadet Corps has 
"been awarded the Governor General's Challenge Shield. 

"I am directed also to extend to you, the instructor, and the Cadets of Bishop's 
"College School, the congratulations of the staff at National Defence Headquarters 
"on the exceptionally high standard of efficiency attained by the Corps." 

Headmaster's Report 

Major McGreevy then called upon Mr. S. P. Smith, M.A., headmaster, to present 
his report, which was in part as follows: — 

"On Thanksgiving Day last year mention was made of the endowment fund be- 
queathed by Col. G. Hooper to the school, subject to a life interest. His library was left 
to us under similar conditions; and it is due to Mrs. Hooper's generosity that the books 
have already become ours. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 49 



In football this term the teams have eclipsed their performance of last year. Six 
matches have been played by the first team against five other schools, and all of these 
matches were won; B.C.S. scoring 124 points against 21 points scored by their opponents. 
"Of the eight hundred candidates from schools in Quebec and other provinces who 
sat for the McGill matriculation examination in June, one in every three failed; while of 
the fifteen boys from Bishop's College School, who sat for this examination, fourteen were 
successful, and qualified for admission to McGill without taking any supplemental 
examinations. 

"E. Rocksborough-Smith, the head boy of the School, passed in advanced mathe- 
matics and Greek, in addition to the ten papers required for arts matriculation. As he 
chose to enroll at Bishop's University, the Greenshields Scholarship tenable at McGill 
was awarded to C. D. Johnston, who came second and had passed in advanced mathe- 
matics as well as in Latin. 

"Six boys were this summer admitted to the Royal Military College, bringing the 
number of those who have gone to Kingston from Lennoxville during the last seven 
years up to thirty-six. 

In conclusion the headmaster spoke of the good work being done under Mr. Wilkinson 
in the Preparatory School, and drew attention to the high positions taken by ex-preparat- 
ory school boys in the Upper School. 

Mr. Robb's Address 

Following the headmaster's report the chairman requested Mr. W. D. Robb, vice- 
president of the Canadian National Railways to present the prizes. In introducing Mr. 
Robb, Major McGreevy humorously stated that while he was not personally a close 
acquaintance of Mr. Robb, he knew him to be a great friend of Sir Harry Lauder, and 
therefore presumed him to be a Scotsman. 

In as light a vein Mr. Robb acknowledged the introduction, and then, after pleading 
that he be absolved from any apparent intention of taking advantage of the occasion to 
preach to his audience he delivered an inspiring and instructive address. 

Mr. Robb said in part: — 

"As we grow older our thoughts revert to the scenes and friendships of our youth. 
You can therefore realize what a great additional pleasure it is for me to be here today, 
as I have returned to the environment and surroundings where I spent many happy days 
as a boy. I went to School at the Sherbrooke Academy. Sherbrooke at that time was 
only a village. I lived just on the eastern outskirts of Sherbrooke where the Grand Trunk 
shops were situated. Therefore the surrounding country, including Lennoxville, was 
familiar to me as a boy. 

"Permit me to congratulate you upon the advantage you possess in the training you 
are receiving here. You are students in one of the best colleges in Canada, a college of 
fine traditions and noble attainments. The course of studies you pursue, the character 
of training you receive, all are most carefully prepared by those who know what is most 
needed and most desirable in equipping you for your work in the world. Bear this 



50 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



thought always in mind, that nothing you learn here is unimportant, that the things you 
may be inclined to look upon as unimportant will some day reveal themselves to you as 
being of the utmost importance. 

"I think the greatest thing in life is to be able to "play the game." This is a figure 
of speech, readily understood by those who go to college because games play a large part 
in college life. But for men and women alike your whole student life, the games you play, 
the training you receive, the contact you have from day to day with your fellow students, 
serve to drill you in certain attributes of character and principles of conduct which in 
later years become the very fundamentals of success and happiness. 

"It seems to me that there are three things you learn in college that stand out as 
pre-eminently in your future life. The first of these is courage, or, better perhaps, self- 
reliance. You will need all the courage and self-reliance at your command when you 
come out into the world; courage to follow through unswervingly the goal of your ambition 
in life, courage to meet the disillusionments and discouragements which are bound to 
come, courage above all to do the right thing in the face of criticism and sometimes of 
persecution. 

"Another thing you learn is loyalty; loyalty to those you work with, loyalty to es- 
tablished institutions; loyalty to the traditions of your college and of your early training, 
loyalty to constitutional authority; finally, loyalty to the ideals you cherish. You will 
find the attribute of loyalty one of the greatest essentials of life. 

"A third thing you learn might be called co-operation. We hear a good deal about 
co-operation today, but the ability to co-operate has always been a great essential, even 
in the least things of life. We cannot get very far in this world unless we are good co- 
operators, able to work hand in hand with our fellow men, to the ultimate good of all 
concerned, Co-operation, involves tolerance, the ability to see the other man's viewpoint. 
It involves self-control, the readiness to overlook the mistakes and the faults and even 
the insults of others, in the larger work of attaining a common object of public good. 

"All these, and other things, you find to be the basis of your training here, calculated 
to equip you to act well your part in whatever sphere of life you choose, to put the very 
best that is in you into whatever you are doing. 

"No doubt the students here today during their scholastic career have realized there 
is no royal easy-going road to learning. It must be by work and continual grinding 
against disappointments, discouragements, and often even oppressions. Yet these can 
all be conquered, and in the end you will find that the most fragrant flower in the garden 
of true success is the rose of achievement, whose leaves have been woven out of conquered 
hindrances. Therefore, when you leave the college and go out to face the world and take 
up your life's work, roll up your sleeves, and work, work, work. That is what Edison 
meant when he said that genius consists of just two parts, two per cent, of inspiration 
and 98 per cent, of perspiration." 

Prizes Presented 

Prizes were then presented to the successful students who headed the School in the 
examinations for the academic year of 1926-1927, and when Mr. Robb had completed 
this pleasant task the Lord Bishop of Quebec moved a vote of thanks. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 51 



At the conclusion of the prize-giving, the guests adjourned to the library and the 
Ross dining hall, where tea was served. Then, in the Ross Gymnasium, a pleasant hour 

of dancing followed. 

Prize List 

The prize list, 1927, is as follows:— 

Upper School— Governor General's medal, E. Rocksborough-Smith. 

Lieutenant Governor's medal (mathematics), E. Rocksborough-Smith; (classics), 
E. Rocksborough-Smith. 

Mr. Grant Hall's medal for Oratory, C. Rankin. 

Form Prizes:— VI, Old Boys' prize, E. Rocksborough-Smith; Mrs. G. R. Hooper 
(special), E. Rocksborough-Smith; 2nd, C. D. Johnston; V— 1st, G. A. Sharp; 2nd 
P B Coristrne; IV— 1st G. H. Montgomery, 2nd, H. M. Howell; IIIA— 1st, A. W. 
Barry 2nd J. D. Lorimer; IIIB, 1st, E. C. Harvey, 2nd D. D. MacKinnon. 

Bible Prizes:— V—G A. Sharp; IV— G. H. Montgomery; IIIA, J. H. G. McGreevy; 

IIIB, R, G. Mackay. 

Mathematical prizes:— V—G. A. Sharp, IV— Irving Prize, G. H. Montgomery. 

English prizes:— VI, C. D. Johnston; The M. Holt Essay Prize, H. G. Greig. 

French prizes :— VI— E. Rocksborough-Smith; V—G. D. Roberts; IV— G. H. 
Mongtomery; IIIA— A. W. Barry; IIIB— R. D. Anderson. 

Latin prizes:— V—G. D. Roberts; IV— G. H. Montgomery; IIIA— J. D. Lorimer. 

Science prizes:— VI— Mrs. J. P. Black's prize, W. M. Murray; V—G. A. Sharp. 

Music prize: — G. A. Sharp. 

Drawing:— Mr. C. C. Kay's prize, H. G. Greig. 

Preparatorv School— Headmaster's prize, P. L. MacDougall. 

Form Prizes:— Remove, J. R. Sare; IDA— G. M. Drummond; IIB— G. D. Cochrane, 
I— J. M. Boothroyd. 

Scripture — R. W. Davis. 

Mathematics — D. S. Gurd. 

French — J. R. Sare. 

Latin — S. F. Hubbard. 

Drawing, Mr. C. C. Kay's prize— F. W. McCaffrey. 

The M. Holt essay prize— A. J. H. Richardson. 

Among the Visitors 

Visitors at Bishop's College School, Lennoxville, Thanksgiving Day, were:— 
From Montreal:— Mr. and Mrs. W. D. Robb, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. H. Montgomery, 
Mrs R G Sare, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon MacDougall, the Misses MacDougall, Mrs. H. B. 
MacDougall, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Dale, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Carter, Mr. and Mrs. Hugh 
Millar, Mrs. R. N. Taylor, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Riddell, Mr. and Mrs. J. McEntyre, 
Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Gudewill, Mrs. Harold Kennedy, Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Duncan, Mrs. 
T. T. Stoker, Mrs. H. W. Blaylock, Mr. Andrew Breakey, Messrs. George Auld, Gordon 
Reich William Mitchell, Ambrose O'Meara, George Baker, Douglas Johnston, Colin 
Rankin, Brian McGreevy, Mrs. Arthur Barry, Mrs. Power Cleghorn, Mrs. F. H. Markey, 
Mr and Mrs. A. E. Ogilvie, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. S. McLennon, Mr. and Mrs. W. K. 



52 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Walker, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Rankin, Mr. Ross Pattern, Mr. and Mrs. R. Moncel, Dr. 
J. C. Meakins, Mrs. C. B. Mackay, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. J. Luther, Mr. Jos. Johnston, 
Mrs. E. L. Howell, Mr. and Mrs. Riley Hern, Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Gillespie, Lady Drum- 
mond, Mrs. S. B. Coristine, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Black, Mr. Kingdon Black, Mr. R. Mac- 
Dougall, Mr. John Patton. 

From Quebec :— Mr. and Mrs. John Breakey. Major and Mrs. H. S. McGreevy, Mr. 
and Mrs. Allen Boswell, Dr. and Mrs. A. R. F. Hubbard, Major J. H. and Mrs. Price. 

From New York: — Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Cochrane, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Sidenberg, 
Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Patton. 

Mr. and Mrs. W. G. E. Aird and Mrs. W. J. Langston, from Three Rivers. 

Mr. G. H. Read, St. Felix de Valois. 

Mrs. R. P. Doucet, Mr. Pothier Doucet, from Thetford Mines. 

Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Wilson, Rimouski. 




BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



53 



THE MEETING 

Come one, come all, to the old Roof Garden! 

Lois of rubbish to be gone through, 
Many a poem, many a story, 

Some are drivel, but some will do. 

Roll up, roll up to the Editor's sanctum, 

All ye boys on the Magazine staff! 
There's many a proof to be corrected, 

And talented work to be sorted from chaff. 

Come in, come in, the meeting's just started, 
We've got to get finished as soon as we can: 

Get busy and type this, you lazy loafer, 
By gosh! here's a story we'll have to ban. 

Work on, work on, take a look at these class notes 
The Fifth form line up— Oh, Gee, what'a mess, 

How many jokes about masters and soaking, 
But here is a story just right for the press! 

Look here, look here, if this isn't priceless, 

Here's a master called a fool! 
Here's a boy fit for the mad-house! 

What an honour for the School! 

Adieu, adieu to the old Roof Garden! 

The magazine now is gone to press. 
To-morrow: Christmas, home and beauty, 

After all this storm and stress! 

I. OGILVIE. 






54 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 













JOE" BLINCO 

Captain of Football, Commander of the Cadet Corps and Senior Prefect 

Captain of Hockey, Captain of Basketball, Captain of Cricket. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



55 




I. B.C.S. vs. U. B. C. 



LIST OF GAMES 

October 1st Score 



II. 



III. 



IV. 



V. 



VI. 



VII. 



VIII. 



vs. Stanstead 



vs. L.C.C. 



vs. Ashbury 



vs. Westmount 



vs. Stanstead 



8th. 



15th. 



22ml. 



24th. 



29th. 



vs. Loyola 



vs. Old Boys 



November 2nd . 



7th. 



B.C.S. 2nd Team vs. Ashbury 2nd, October 22nd 
October 15th. 



B.C.S 30 

U.B.C () 

B.C.S 15 

Stanstead 9 

B.C.S 21 

L.C.C 1 2 

B.C.S 31 

Ashbury 1 

B.C.S 7 

Westmount 

B.C.S 35 

Stanstead 5 

B.C.S 12 

Loyola 5 

B.C.S 16 

Old Boys 

B.C.S 27 

Ashbury 3 



B. 



C. S. vs. L. C. C. 
21 2 

B.C.S. started with the play right from the beginning and gained yards every down. 
After five or ten minutes' play Fuller kicked a drop over the bar. Hern followed a few 
minutes later with a touchdown which Fuller failed to convert. Before the half was 
over Hern went over for another touch ; L.C.C. only scoring a rouge. The score was 13-1 . 
The third quarter started well with both teams playing hard. L.C.C. was holding 
Bishop's, but Hern, the speedy B.C.S. half back, again went over for the third touch- 
down of the game. L.C.C. worked hard and were able to get another rouge. Bishop's 
secured the ball near the touch line and Fuller kicked another drop, the game ending 
21-2. 







56 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



From the Sherbrooke Record — (Stanstead's notes on the game). 

Our hopes of coming out on top were rudely shattered on Saturday, October 29th 
when Bishop's College School defeated us in the last game of the season. Considerable 
interest was noted and a good crowd gathered to watch the struggle. Bishop's took the 
lead early in the game and continually increased it, so that the outcome was never for 
a moment in doubt. The team as a whole deserves credit, and especially the work of 
Blinco and Hern. Stanstead faced a rugby team that is not often found beneath Uni- 
versity circles. It is no disgrace to be beaten by a team like B.C.S. The locals have 
played better games than the one on Saturday. Maule's absence in the back field was 
felt, and Hartley's weak ankle was a serious handicap. The subs, however, turned in 
a good game. Kimpton and Van Vliet played stellar rugby. Stanstead demonstrated 
that they were good losers. They fought hard, took their knocks with a smile, and 
praised their victors. Thus was the defeat in a measure turned into victory. Final 
score 35-5. 

Taken from "The Montreal Gazette." 

B.C.S. BEAT WESTMOUNT 

Scored 7-0 Win in Exhibition Rugby Match at Westmount. 

Bishop's College School defeated Westmount High seniors, 7-0, in an exhibition 
rugby match played yesterday afternoon at Westmount Park. The game was a good 
one, both teams playing well and hard throughout, with the winners holding what edge 
there was. Bishop's have a strong squad that is equally good on attack and defence, 
and quick to take advantage of an opportunity to score. Westmount are present cham- 
pions of the Montreal and District Interscholastic Football League and, though they 
have been somewhat inconsistent this season, are capable of giving their opposition a 
stern fight when they get going. 

Bishop's worked their way down the field in the opening quarter and Westmount 
found themselves in possession on their one-yard line. Laurie attempted to kick out of 
danger. The ball went awry off the side of his boot, rolling to the ground well behind 
Westmount's goal line and a Bishop's man dashed in and fell on it for a touch. It was 
not converted. 

Westmount worked hard, but B.C.S. were still forcing the play and got into position 
for a drop-kick in the second period. Fuller kicked, the ball was wide of the posts but 
went for a rouge. Play became more even and Westmount held the visitors well. 
Though the High School failed to score themselves, they kept Bishop's completely out 
in the third quarter and allowed but one point in the final period. This was the result 
of another attempted drop by Fuller, the ball again missing the posts but going for a 
rouge. 

Bishop's College School :— Flying wing, Kenny; halves, Blinco, Fuller, Hern; quarter 
Cleghorn; snap, Read; insides, Hadfield, D. Drury; middles, Black, Duggan; 'outsides' 
Sharp, Payan; subs, Taylor and C. Drury. 



* 




03 
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f 
t- 1 

ft) 

Q 

Q 
W 

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o 
f 



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~4 



FIRST TEAM 



58 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Westmount High:— Flying wing, Murphy; halves, Laurie, D. Nesbitt, Vennor; 
quarter, Pepper; snap, Reiffenstein ; insides, Salter, McRobie; middles, Marshall, Foster; 
outsides, Keating, Collis; subs., Hart, Markham, Freedman, L. MacDonald, Falkner 
and McAuley. 

Taken from "The Montreal Gazette." 

ASHBURY COLLEGE LOST TO BISHOP'S. 
B.C.S. Overwhelmed Ottawa School Team, 31.1, in Annual Rugby Encounter. 



Bishop's College School overwhelmed Ashbury College, 31-1 in the annual rugby 
match played here between these two schools Saturday morning, on the Loyola grounds. 
The score is indicative of the respective merits of the teams; Bishop's were in every sense 
the superior aggregation. The winners assumed an early lead in the first quarter, gain- 
ing two points, but at that Ashbury held them well enough. After Bishop's first touch 
in the second period, Ashbury wilted. They appeared to have lost all spirit and team- 
work, and their efforts to stay the purple and white onslaught seemed half-hearted. 
Desperation gripped them in the final quarter and for a time they put up a fight. But 
it was too late then. Had they fought similarly from the start, Bishop's would have, 
indeed, earned their victory. 

B.C.S. have a powerful outfit that is worthy sterner opposition. They work con- 
sistently on attack and defence, combine well as a team and get their plays away nicely. 
Admittedly there were two "breaks" in their favour that directly resulted in scores, 
but these made little difference, as Bishop's at the time were well ahead of their opponents. 

The winners kicked off, Fuller booting a beauty for the first point. Play was 
generally cautious during this period, the best that the purple and white could do was 
to add another rouge, Fuller punting from centre. Ashbury opened strongly in the 
second quarter and worked their way down to Bishop's five-yard line, but a fumble lost 
them the ball. Bishop's kicked out of danger and play was at centre field with Ashbury 
in possession. Bishop's blocked a kick and Hern gathered in the loose ball, and galloped 
fifty yards for the purple and white's first touch. Fuller failed to convert. 

Bishops began ripping into the Ashbury line in deadly fashion and worked through 
to Ashbury's 25-yard lino. Blinco was given the ball on a line plunge, and tore through 
for the second touch. It was not converted. 

The Lennoxville team continued to hold easy command of play after the rest interval, 
and were soon in position for a drop kick. Fuller kicked, the ball hit the cross-bar, but 
luck was with him, and it bounded over, to make it 15-0. B.C.S. got another lucky 
break shortly after, when Ashbury kicked and the ball dropped on one of their wings, 
who was heading for the Bishop's catcher. A Bishop's end run immediately brought 
play to Ashbury's five-yard line and Hern went over on a buck through middle. There 
was no convert. 

Blinco returned Ashbury's kick-off to the dead-line and B.C.S. led 21-0, at the end 
of the third. Ashbury rallied somewhat in the last quarter and held Bishop's better. 
The latter made yards, but could get no closer than for a kick. Irvin just managed 
to run Fuller's punt back into play and, on the first down and with the wind at his back 




SECOND FOOTBALL TEAM. 



CO 



60 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 

he booted 70 yards, well into Bishop's territory. However B.C.S. promptly made up 
their lost ground with a particularly effective fake kick play. Bishop's punted to Ash- 
bury's 10, Southam misjudged the ball and fumbled. Hern scooped it up and scored the 
fourth try. It was unconverted. Later, when B.C.S. were again in possession, Fuller 
kicked and dashed up the field to recover his own punt, directly paving the way for 
Cleghorn's touch, Bishop's last score of the game. 

Ashbury came again right at the end, fought their way down the field and Irvin 
kicked for the Ottawans' lone point. 

Bishop's College School:— Flying wing, Kenny; halves, Blinco, Fuller, Hern; 
quarter, Cleghorn; snap, Read; insides, Haclfield, D. Drury; middles, Black, Duggan; 
outsides, Sharp, Payan; subs., Taylor and C. Drury. 

Ashbury College :— Flying wing, Bates; halves, Irvin, Fauquier, Southam; quarter, 
Wilson; snap, Graham; insides, Ewart, Guthrie; middles, Irvine, MacKenzie; outsides, 
Gamble, Gilman; subs. Duguid and Turner. 

B.C.S. DEFEATED LOYOLA SCHOOL TWELVE TO FIVE 



Exhibition Rugby Game Played Yesterday Afternoon at Lennoxville— Play 
Featured by Spectacular Runs of Gorman, Visiting Back— Game 
Fast, With Locals Having Best of Argument During Greater 
Part of Playing Time. 

(Taken from the Sherbrooke Daily Record) 
The Bishop's College School rugby squad won a clean cut victory over the visiting 
Loyola juniors, champions of the Western Division Interscholastic Rugby Lea-ue in 
an exhibition encounter at the Bishop's College School campus yesterday afternoon, 
the nnai count being twelve to five. 

A strong wind was blowing down the field and both teams kicked at every oppor- 
tunity when the. wind was in their favour. Fuller handled the purple and white's kicks 
while the Loyola booting was done by Gravel, who did not show up so well in this line 
as the sc h oi back . Thc fil , t three quarters ^ ^ ^ ^ & e 

who z bvn t r r° st , op , the heavy bucidng ° f the pur P ie and white "A 

who, lead by Cleghorn, tore through for yards time after time, while Fuller and Blinco 
Lovnl, ^f ™! ™ d «- ^ds. It was largely through the efforts of Gorman 
Loyola half that the visitors were saved from a severe beating. The little half back 
was by far the best man on the field yesterday, making spectacular broken field Ls to 
bring the pigskm out of Loyola territory; if he had received the backing he was entiled 
o the results of the game might have been different. As it was, he made Sty forty 
an even fifty yard runs fame after time, and was the cause of many anxious momenta 
to the school team and their supporters. odious moments 

The first quarter opened with the purple and white twelve kicking with the wind 
The game was hardly under way when Fuller kicked behind the I nvnl! , a v 

brought down Gorman for a forced rouge that netted Tt^lo^ZZo£V ^^ 
a time remained » midfield, both teams making several bad fumbles Loyola ZlZ 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



61 



yards on bucks several times, but their efforts were nullified by Fuller, who took ad- 
vantage of the heavy wind and sent the pigskin sailing back in long spirals every time 
the B.C.S. team gained the ball. Score 2 to 0. 

The purple and white had matters their own way in the second quarter. Riley 
started the ball rolling with a forty yard run, while Blinco and Cleghorn cut down the 
distance to the Loyola line to enable the former to cover the remaining thirty yards to 
cross the visitor's line for a touch, which brought the local boys five additional points. 
Fuller failed to convert. The purple and white squad continued to hold the play and 
chances looked promising for another five points, when the hopes of the Loyola boys 
were raised by Gorman, who made a few of his spectacular runs before the second quarter 
ended with the score board reading, "B.C.S., 7, Loyola 0." 

Fuller's long spiral to the Loyola line was, indirectly, the cause of the school notching 
up what proved to be their last five points in the third quarter. Fuller kicked. The 
pigskin was carried out of bounds by the wind near the Loyola line. The visitors lost 
the ball on the first down and, with five yards to go, Blinco found it an easy matter to 
cross the line for a touch. Fuller did not convert. Gorman came into his own, and for 
the rest of the quarter gave the hard tackling Bishop's boys a chance to prove their 
mettle. The quarter ended with B.C.S. leading 12 to 0. 

It was a different Loyola squad that took the field in the last quarter. Inspired by 
the work of their team mate, the visitors went into the fray with a determination to even 




THIRD FOOTBALL TEAM. 



62 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



up matters. Gravel sent the sphere sailing back of the school line. Fuller caught and 
made a good run to carry the pigskin across before being brought down. The purple 
and white twelve fought desperately to hold back the rejuvenated Montrealers, but to 
no avail, and slowly but surely they were forced back to the end of their field until the 
ten yard line was reached. Here the locals had one of the narrowest escapes of the day. 
Fuller kicked. The ball, blocked, rebounded and, striking the cross bar, bounded into 
the gridiron again, where Gorman fell on it. Loyola had possession of the ball on the 
Bishop's ten yard line on first down. It only took one down for Benziger to knife through 
the School line for a touch. Cummings failed to convert the try. The greater part of 
the remaining time was spent in a kicking duel between Fuller and Gravel, interspersed 
with runs by Blinco and Gorman. The score at time was 12 to 5 for B.C.S. 



The Line-up: 




Loyola 




B.C.S. 


McVey 


flying wing 


Kenny 


Byrn 


half 


Blinco 


Gorman 


half- 


Fuller 


Rigney 


half 


Hern 


Cummings 


quarter 


Cleghorn 


Walsh 


snap 


Read 


Benziger 


inside 


Drury 


Segatore 


inside 


Hadfield 


Ahern 


middle 


Black 


Laranaga 


middle 


Duggan 


Baskerville 


outside 


Payan 


Shaughnessy 


outside 


Sharp 


Daly 


sub. 


Taylor 


Belair 


sub. 


Drury II 


Hefferman 


sub. 


Roberts 


Rvan 


sub. 






BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



63 




h'< 



Mr. E. X. Montague 

Mr. E. X. Montague came to the School this fall with ample recommendation as a 
football coach. Had he not played at one time on the Loyola senior team, and remained 
there subsequently to coach them? Early in September Mr. Montague arrived; only 
two months later all were regretting the close of the season and his departure. In that 
brief time he had built up a sound football team and had guided it through a strenuous 
season undefeated. With modesty characteristic of him, Monty ascribed that success 
to the boys themselves. The team, on the other hand, outnumbering him twelve to one, 
holds a different opinion. Which view is the correct one, it is impossible to say. 

It is with great pleasure that the School anticipates his return in January to handle 
the hockey teams. To both we wish every success. 



64 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




Kenny. "Buck" at flying-wing was generally re- 
liable defensively, fast and a steady tackier. Sound 
rather than a brilliant player. 



"BUCK" 



Fuller. "Jack" at right half played his usual dash- 
ing game. A deadly tackier; a long, sure kicker; and 
a splendid broken-field runner, he seems to have no 
weak spots in his football armour. 




'JACK' 




Hern. "Riley" at the other end of the half line was 
always m the play and a bear for loose balls. Special- 
ty—touches after 40 or 50 yard runs, the rest of the 
field left standing. 



'RILEY' 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



65 






Blinco. "Joe" (Captain) at centre half led the team 
through a heavy season without defeat. A demon at 
breaking up enemy plays, a rugged line-plunger, crafty 
in field tactics, he usually had the team on its toss. 
Always good, but rose to his best at critical times, 
and carried the team with him. 





•JOE" 



Cleghom. "Jimmy" improved greatly over last year 
and made a good quarter. Shewed judgment in 
picking plays from his repertoire, and on secondary 
defence let very little get by. 



JIMMY" 



Read. "Rid" turned in a neat season's work at 
snap. His best asset lies in "sticking to it", for he 
got his training last year from a tough snap. His 
line of talk was a consistent goat-getter of the enemy, 
to say nothing of bucking up the School wings. One 
of the strong spots in a strong line. 




"RID' 



66 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




Hadfield. "Had" handled inside wing as though 
born for the job, backed up snap and middle along- 
side, and hit the line like a pile-driver. The bigger 
and tougher his cover, the better he played. 



Drury I. "Dave" held down the inside berth and 
usually gave his cover (and other opponents) a mean 
time. Broke through consistently, tackled hard and 
was a lion of defence. One of the hardest workers 
on the team. 





Black at middle proved a real find after moving up 
from 1926 second team half line. Used every ounce 
of his light weight in hurdling through the line and 
worried his opponents every minute of the game 



"NIGGER" 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



67 



Duggan. "Herry" is one hard-boiled middle, fear- 
less in line plunging- and stopping them cold coming 
through. Great on defence and fast as the outsicles 
down the field under kicks. Gave the enemy more 
trouble than any other player of the line. 




'HERRY' 




Sharp. "Pusher" lived up to the best school tradi- 
tions for the outside position — fast, a good tackier, 
dependable ball carrier and a constant worry to 
opposing halves. Frequently had to wait around for 
Jack's kicks to descend. 



'PUSHER" 



Payan. "Pipper One" teamed well with Sharp, and 
if a trifle slower down the field was the more deadly 
tackier. At his best, nothing got away from him, 
and hostile end runs often came to grief at his post. 




"PIPPER ONE' 



68 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




The Subs. Drury II, Roberts and Taylor, had little 
chance to shew their ability during the season, for 
the team escaped serious injuries throughout. To 
their credit be it said that they kept in good condition 
and pulled through several hard games without relief. 
But the Subs, were alwa3's ready and when called 
upon played their positions without weakening the 
machine. These boys fully deserve to share the 
honour of belonging to a dashing, resourceful and un- 
beaten team. 





LOYOLA GAME. 




LOYOLA GAME. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



69 



THE ISLE OF BEAUTY 

On the beaches the sand is far redder than coral 

The ocean rolls up like the sun from the east. 
It cares not for person or country or moral 

And defies, with fine hauteur, both greatest and least. 
The little white houses, with cedars and flowers, 

And beautiful roofs tiled entirely in red. 
The spot is renowned for ivy-grown bowers 

Where lovers relate all the past they have led. 
But where can we find such glorious beaches — 

Whose sand is far redder than coral, they say, 
(And the ocean, ah me! must be void of all leeches), 



And wonderful flowers that blossom in M 



ay 



Where to be found are these houses and lilies 
With beautiful roofs done entirely in red. 

Where lovers, in bowers amid daffydowndillies, 

Sing to radiant maids, till the moon has quite fled ? 



H. I. KENNEDY. 




k 



'f* ]■'" •■ &<&**#£ 



THE WATER TOWER. 



70 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




{June Gfo^ng 



From Montreal Gazette. 

Grant Hall Presented Prizes After Annual Sports at Lennoxville. 

Lennoxville, Que,. June 14th — The closing ceremonies commenced at Bishop's 
College School, Lennoxville, this morning with the annual athletic sports which were 
witnessed by a large number of parents, old hoys and friends. The Charles Fortune 
medal for the senior athletic championship was won by L. S. Blineo; the championship 
open to boys under sixteen years of age, by T. R. Kenny, and the Preparatory School 
by A. Read. The medal offered by Hon. Walter Mitchell for the boy who, through his 
industry, prominence in athletics, and influence with his fellows has been of the greatest 
service to the school during the yea.]-, fell to John Patton, who also carried off the Charles 
Martin Cup for gymnastics. 

At, the conclusion of the sports the headmaster, Mr. S. P. Smith, called upon Mr- 
Grant Hall, whom he described as an old boy with a most distinguished career, to dis- 
tribute the prizes. Mr. Hall, who was greeted with enthusiastic cheers, said that as an 
old boy greatly interested in the school, he always found great difficulty in refusing an 
invitation to come to Lennoxville, and he was very happy to be present on this occasion. 

The Band of the Sherbrooke regiment was in attendance during the sports and the 
arrangement for the races were in the hands of Mr. F. E. Hawkins. Lunch was served 
n the Ross Dining Room, at ons o'clock, after which the annual cricket match against a 
team of old boys was played on the School campus, and resulted in a victory "for the 
present school team by three wickets. Following are the results of the sports-— ' 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 71 



UPPER SCHOOL EVENTS 

Open, cross-country race— 1, H. 0. L. Duggan; 2, J. Fuller; 3, K. S. Grant 

Open, mile— 1, J. Fuller; 2, E. R. Smith; 3, Duggan. Time, 5 mins., 24 sees. 

Open, quarter mile— 1, J. P. Cleghorn; 2, E. R. Smith; 3, A. Hern. Time, 63 sees. 

Open, 220 yards— 1, C. Rankin; 2, L. Blinco; 3, J. Fuller. 

Open, 100 yards— 1, C. Rankin; 2, A. Hern; 3, L. Blinco. Time 11 seconds. 

Open hurdles— 1, J. Patton; 2, L. Blinco; 3, C. Dobell. 

Open High Jump— 1, J. Patton; 2, A. Patton; 3, A. Hern. Height, 5 ft. 5% inches. 

Open broad jump— 1, E. R. Smith; 2, A. Hern; 3, C. Dobell. Distance, 18 feet, 
1 inch. 

Open pole vault— 1, A. Hern; 2, J. Rankin; 3, L. Blinco. 

Open throwing cricket ball— 1, J. Fuller; 2, L. S. Blinco; 3rd, J. Patton. Dis- 
tance, 91/4 yards. 

Open putting shot— 1, L. S. Blinco; 2, C. Rankin. Distance 28 ft, 9 inches. 

Junior cross-country race— 1, R. W. Davis; 2, T. R. Kenny; 3, E. Waver. 

Junior quarter-mile— 1, T. R. Kenny; 2, R. Davis; 3, J. Meakins. 

Junior 100 yards— 1, T. R. Kenny; 2, P. Blaylock; 3, W. Patton. 

Junior hurdles— 1, T. R. Kenny; 2, C. Drury; 3, W. Patton. 

Junior broad jump— 1, T. R. Kenny; 2, G. Roberts; 3, W. Patton. Distance 
15 ft. 9 inches. 

Junior high jump— 1, T. R. Kenny; 2, R. G. Mackay; 3, G. Roberts. Height 

4 ft. 10 inches. 

Open tennis singles — C. D. Johnston. 

Open tennis doubles— H. L. Hall and C. D. Johnston. 

Junior tennis singles — E. S. Coristine. 

Junior tennis doubles — A. Sharp and P. Payan. 

880 yards handicap— 1, C. Rankin; 2, E. R. Smith. 

Sack race— 1, J. P. Cleghorn; 2, D. Drury. 

Three-legged race — J. P. Cleghorn and C. Dobell. 

Consolation race — W. M. Murray. 

J. K. L. Ross Gymnastic Cups— C. Dobell, J. Patton, A. Hern, T. R, Kenny, L. 
S. Blinco, G. Roberts', R. W. Davis, W. Patton, D. Hadfield, A. Rankin, G. MacDougall, 
G. H. Armstrong;. 

Preparatory School Events: 

100 yards— 1, F. N. Dale; 2, A. Read. 

200 yards— 1, F. N. Dale; 2, J. A. McClure. 

100 yards, junior— 1, E. C. Holloway; 2, G. Drummond. 

Handicap— 1, A. J. Richardson; 2, A. P. Boswell. 

Hurdles— 1, F. N. Dale; 2, J. A. McClure. 

High jump— 1, D. S. Gurd; 2, G. Clarke; Height, 4 feet. 

Broad jump— 1, F. N. Dale; 2, A. Read; Distance, 12 ft, 10/2 inches. 

Three-legged race— 1, A. Read and G. Clarke. 

Sack race— 1, H. E. P. Wilson; 2, G. Luther. 



72 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Throwing cricket ball— 1, A. Read; 2, V. C. Harshaw. Distance 76 yards. 

Tennis singles — G. M. Luther. 

Tennis doubles — F. N. Dale and D. S. Gurd. 

Consolation race — 1, P. Davis. 

The following were among those present: 

From Montreal :— Mr. and Mrs. H. B. MacDougall, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Ogilvie, Miss 
Ogilvie, Mrs. S. B. Coristine, Mr. and Mrs. David Hogg, Miss Isabel Hogg, Mr. and 
Mrs. Paul Sise, Mr. and Mrs. R. J. Dale, Mr. Alan Dale, Mrs. G. H. Montgomery, 
Miss Montgomery, Mrs. V. M. Drury, Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Gillespie, Mrs. Douglas 
Cowans, Capt. and Mrs. T. T. McG. Stoker, Mr. and Mrs. Riepert, Mr. L. W. Davis, 
Mi', and Mrs. J. L. Rankin, Dr. J. C. Meakins, Mr. George Hall, Mrs. C. P. Cleghorn, 
Mr. and Mrs. Gordon MacDougall, Mrs. Sare, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Lorimer, Mrs. Hugh 
Doheny, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Murray, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. J. Luther, Mr. Douglas 
Luther, Mrs. Gudewill, Mi', and Mrs. Pritchard, Mrs. Lacaille. 

From Quebec— Mr. and Mrs. Frank Ross, Major and Mrs. McGreevy, Dr. and 
Mrs. Hubbard, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Clarke, Mrs. R. R. Anderson, Mrs. Donald Atkinson, 
Mr. and Mrs. Allen Boswell. 

From New York— Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Patton, Miss Jessie Patton, Mr. and. Mrs. 
J. H. Sidenberg, Mr. Wilshire Harcourt, Mr. Ogden Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. George 
Cochrane. Others— Mr. H. W. Sangster, of Windsor, N.S.; Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Weaver, 
of Romney, Va.; Mrs. MacNeill, of Ottawa; Mrs. T. F. Kenny, of Buckingham, Que.; 
Mrs. H. A. K. Drury, Mrs. E. L. Howell, of Ottawa; Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Read, of St. 
Felix de Valois; Mr. Dyer, of Portland, Me.; Mr. and Mrs. Payan and Miss Payan of 
St. Hyacinthe; Mr. N. Moseley, St, Hyacmthe; Mr. and Mrs. Doucet, Thetford Mines; 
Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Wilson, Rimouski; Mr. and Mrs. Holloway, Matane; Prof, and 
Mrs. Richardson, Prof, and Mrs. Boothroyd, Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Fuller, Miss Fuller, 
Archdeacon Wright, Canon Bigg, Mr. and Mrs. John Neill, of Fredericton, N.B.; Mr! 
and Mrs. F. C. Baker, of Lennoxville and Mrs. F. W. McKinnon, Ottawa.' 




So nigh is grandeur to our dust, 

So near is God to man, 
When Duty ivhispers low, Thou must 

The youth replies, I can. 



-Ralph Waldo Emerson. 



73 



74 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




'$rtjjaratnrj$rl)nnl 

of 

ft" 



In the whirligig of time, accompanied by the early snows of this, our wintry season 
the first term of our 1927-28 school year is now rapidly drawing to a close, leaving in its 
wake a memory of happy sunshine gleams, interspersed with the shadows of beneficial 
setbacks to keep us from getting too big for our boots. Shadows bringing, we sincerely 
hope, the clear understanding that too smooth sailing is no preparation for the certain 
ups and downs that must be met by all as they pass through this so-called "vale of tears." 
But, thanks be, there arc many compensating periods to dry this sometimes wet valley— 
the glorious happy Christmas season just ahead of us, which gives us pause to wish all 
our "Old Boys", present boys, and Parents, the cheeriest of greetings. 

Hallowe'en was spent as usual in mysterious jollification, and we are most grateful 
to Mr Kay for his kindly gifts of apples and candy that so helped to add to the material 
joys of the evening. 

The "new kids" are a particularly happy set of mischievous rascals and we are 
glad to see how much they appreciate being youthful members of B.C.S. 

All of us have been thrilled by the excellent showing of the School rubgy team and 
we offer them our most sincere congratulations-having secret hopes that some Blinco 
in embryo may be evolved from some of us small fry. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 75 



Thanksgiving was very much enjoyed by all of us, and we were greatly pleased to 
hear from the excellent report of the Headmaster that four of our "Old Boys" had come 
so high in the McGill matriculation results this summer. 

REMOVE NOTES 

Remove is the best in sport and class 
The other forms are as green as grass, 
We are the seniors of the Prep., 
And so we're always full of pep. 

My first is in step and also in pep, 
My second in run but not in bun, 
My third in pen and also in hen, 
My fourth is in spool and also in pool, 
My whole is the best part of the School, 
My answer is "The Prep." 

Wise Cracks 

Little Girl to her Mother, when some wedding cake had been sent to her : — "Mummy, 
you told me if I put some of this cake under my pillow I would have good luck. Do you 
think if I ate the cake and then put the pillow on my tummy it would work just as well ?" 

Seeing's Believing. 

Some of those bank men are pretty slick with their fingers, Sam told us after his 
visit to the City. I saw a fellow in the bank who had to keep a wet sponge beside him 
to save his fingers from getting red hot! He told me so himself. 

The End of the Story. 

Teacher: — "Now then, Freddie, what comes after 'g' ?" 
Freddie:— "Whizz" .... 

A Good Choice. 

Jock: — "How much are these collars?" 
Salesman: — "Two for fifty cents." 
Jock: — "How much will one cost?" 
Salesman: — "Thirty-five cents." 
Jock:— "Then I'll take the other one." 

"Try one of my cigars, old man, they are the best thing out." 
"But what are they like lighted?" 

Very Painful. 

"You are looking very unhappy, Willie," said his mother, "what's the matter?" 

"Hydrophobia and rheumatism," said Willie. 

"Don't be absurd," said his mother. 

"I'm not. Teacher kept me in all the afternoon because I couldn't spell them." 



76 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Too much of a good thing. 

A distinguished European visitor had arrived in America. He was immediately 
buttonholed by a reporter, who begged him for a contribution to the "Atlantic Monthly." 
"No, thank you," wearily replied the visitor, "I have been contributing to the Atlantic 
daily for a week." 

There was an old lady from France 
Who had the St. Vitus's dance; 
She hopped all night 
And she hopped all day, 
She hopped and hopped 
Till she faded away. 
Right at Hand. 

Teddie: — "Mummy, may I go to the Circus this afternoon ?" 

Mummy: — "My dear child, fancy wanting to go to the Circus when your Aunt 
Jane is here." 



REMOVE LINE UP. 



Name 

Bos well I 

Cothran I 

Dixon 

Drummond 

Grant 

McCaffrey 

Richardson 

Wilson 



Nick- 
name 

Harry 

Coatie 

Dikon 

Dinie 

Curly 

Taffy 

Dickie 

Wally 



Future 
occupation 

Engineer 

Ditto 

Lachine taxi-man 

Circus owner 

Pro. Golfer 

Artist 

Professor 

Lumber-jack 



Pastime 

Going to the woods 

Horses 

Lassoeing 

Playing tag 

Kicking 

Drawing 

Playing detective 

Beating up Holloway 



Favourite 
expression 

"Get out!" 

"You watch out." 

"Guess we're hard up" 

"Cut it out," 

"Get to work." 

"Come on, eh ?" 

"Oh jolly!" 



"Shut 



up! 



IIA NOTES 

Form History 

Thomas a Becket, the king of the Danes 

Summoned the English to Salisbury Plains; 

He chopped off their noses and then dismissed 'em, 

And this was known as the Feudal System. 

Said noble Lord Alfred, of Pictland , the King, 

"Tut, tut, I can never permit such a thing, 

"Just bring me the Domesday Book, there I shall find 

"A recipe that has happened to come to my mind." 

So he baked them some oatcakes as per the direction 

With a nose in each one that was done to perfection; 

Some were blue, some were brown, and others were red 

And the English all shouted : 

"Hooray for King Alfred!" 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 77 



Wouldn't it be a wonder if — 

Baker never got a licking ? 



Boothroyd got all his lessons done ? 

Boswell didn't say "Aw Gee?" 

Cothran didn't forget about the portcullis (in History) ? 

Cochrane didn't say "Cut it out?" 

Holloway didn't get beat up ? 

Kenny didn't lose something ? 

Luther grew up ? 

Moffat didn't get red ? 

McKinnon didn't say "Hard Luck" ? 

Sidenberg reduced ? 

Sheppard stopped being cheeky ? 

IIA PREP. 

Master: — "Kenny, if I hear another peep out of you, you will go to the Office. 
Kenny: — "Peep, peep." 

Teacher (in Grammar class) : — "I am beautiful. What tense is that?" 
Johnnie:— "Past, Miss." 

My first is in Tea 

But not in coffee; 

My second in Wood 

But not in tree; 

My third is in Oven 

But not in fire ; 

My last is in Apple 

But not in plum. 

Can you find what I spell ? 

If not, I'll tell— 

My answer is IIA. 

Spark Plug. 

Sparkey won the race one day 

So Barney gave him a cartload of hay. 

He gave Sunshine a nickle to buy a cigar, 

But the fellow instead bought a chocolate bar. 

Sparkey gave Sunshine a terrible kick 
That made him feel exceedingly sick. 
Barney did a little dance, 
Then Sparkey did a little prance. 



78 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Whatever it is — 

PriTchard 
PoWer 
DOheny 

Boothroyd 

LaCaille 
DuncAn 
MoNcel 

KenneDy 
StrOver 

Gllmour 
McEnTyre. 

Hullaballoo! Hullaballoo! 
The master is in a terrible stew, 

No one knows what took place in one thousand and two! 
See him froth at the mouth — 
Hear him shout, hear him roar! 
We endure it, but really — it's rather a bore. 

Two B. Ambitions. 

Duncan II To eat six meals a day. 

LaCaille To invent a new system of spelling. 

McEntyre II To make bigger and better paper aeroplanes. 

Doheny II To read after lights-out. 

Moncel To join the Indians. 

Gilmour To eat all the candy in the world. 

Boothroyd III To be cheer-leader of the Prep. 

Kennedy II To demonstrate the idea of perpetual motion. 

Pritchard To say everything. 

Power To fight Tunney. 

Strover To teach IIB. 

Mr. L . . . "Translate 'Pax in bello'." 

D-nc-n: — (hesitatingly) — "Er — freedom from indigestion, sir!" 

Master: — "Can you tell me what the backbone is?" 

M-nc-1: — "It's the thing that keeps us from having legs right up to our necks." 

Father (to small boy) : — "You cannot have a new drum because you will make too 
much noise with it." 

Small boy: — "O, please, Dad, I'll only play it when you are asleep." 

Old Gentleman: — "Am I on the right road to London?" 
Small Boy: — "Yes, sir, but you're going the wrong way." 




PREPARATORY SCHOOL FOOTBALL TEAM. 



80 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



FOOTBALL NOTES 

This year's team was composed largely of new material, Grant and Wilson being 
the only old colours with us. 

Games were played with the Old Boys, but with lack of experience we were unable 
to win from them, yet we still shewed the fighting spirit common to the Prep., and gave 
them good games. 

The usual keen competition was evident in the Dormitory Matches. After three 
drawn games the Lower Flat emerged victors. 

Team colours were won by Boswell II, Cochrane, Cothran I, Doheny II, Duncan II, 
Grant (Captain), Holloway, Kenny II, McCaffre}' and Wilson. 

Boswell II did good work in goal, while Kenny and Cochrane as half-backs played 
their positions well. Duncan and Doheny were the only new boys to win colours. 




FROM THE EAST DRIVE. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 81 



"And ah, you proud maiden, you are not so fair when his oar 
Is heard on the water, as they were, the proud and apart, 
Who paced in the eve by the nets on the pebbly shore, 
When I ims a boy ivith never a crack in my heart." 



82 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




THE LATE COL. GEORGE R. HOOPER 
WHOSE LIBRARY IS NOW IN USE AT THE SCHOOL. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE S3 



©tt> ©ops Qotes 



R. M. C. NOTES 

Ross Patton is "A" Company Commander; Hartland Molson is "B" Company 
Commander. 

Bart Ogilvie was raised to the rank of Corporal from Lance-Corporal. 

Guy Smith is a Lance-Corporal, and won the Mile on Sports Day. 

Molson was on first team Rugby, and played well. 

Guy Smith has done some very fine running and went with the Harrier Team, of 
which he is Captain, to Toronto. 

Of those in the III Class— Markey, MacDougall and Hall, all are getting on fine. 
George Hall is taking up squash; and MacDougall did some running on the Field Sports 

Day. 

In the IV Class— Rankin, Grant, Dobell, Patton, Smith and Herbie Hall. 

John Patton is taking up basketball. He excelled in high jumping, coming second 
in the whole College with a jump of 5 ft. 3 inches. Rankin, Grant and Dobell all turned 
out for Rugby. Smith and Hall are both getting on well. 

Donald Grant and Pothier Doucet are both flourishing. 

McGILL NOTES 

Bill Mitchell, Arts I, is treasurer of his class and is playing inter-year basketball. 
We understand that Bill intends to challenge the icy slopes of Mount Royal with his 
Norwegian overshoes again this winter. 

Eric Sangster, Arts I. Like the immortal Faust he has been tempted, but unlike 
Faust he has not yielded — but then, do we really know? 

Willie Murray, Arts I, seems to be working very hard, though he has been known 
to take off time occasionally for the inspection of Case's latest importations of masculine 
apparel. He intends taking Science next year with naval architecture as his final ob- 
jective. 

"Hardy" Johnston, Arts I, attributes his success in class basketball and inter- 
faculty football to a strict, though liberal, diet of griddle cakes. Among other things, 
he has become a devoted disciple of Shakespeare. 

John Rankin, Arts I, is frequently seen dozing in the Arts Building in the day- 
time. He collects Sangster for a merry evening occasionally. 

Andy Breakey, Arts I, has finally given up a career of "Big Business" in favour of a 
literary lapse. Andy is fast becoming a well-known figure around the Daily Office, as 
might'be expected. Strange as it may seem, words failed him recently, and the result 
was his purchase of an Oxford Dictionary. 



84 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



Doug. Luther, Commerce I, spent a strenuous summer overhauling the Stock 
Exchange. Doug, is becoming a very well known figure on the campus. 

"Tusk" Balfour, Commerce II, is still up to his old tricks. It is rumoured that he 
is planning a flight across the Atlantic (or is it the St. Lawrence ?) for the latter part of 
May. (We suggest "Lucky Tusky" to the popular-song writers). 

"Povey" Baker, Commerce II, displayed fine form this year on the Junior football 
team. Rumour has it that Povey is becoming a habitue" of the Library. 

George Auld, Arts II, has at last discovered that though there are lots of colleges, 
there is only one McGill. Since his arrival this fall from Varsity he has become engaged 
in numerous activities, notably the Players Club and the English Literature Club. 

"Bunty" Sise, Arts II, played with the Intermediate football team this fall. He 
has introduced a number of R.M.C. customs into McGill since his arrival. 

Max Boulton, Arts II, is lending his wit to the Arts Sophomore debates, and is 
also engaged on the technical side of the Players Club. There is a rumour afloat — but 
on second thought, never mind! 

R. A. Montgomery, Architecture II, continues to perform his good work on the 
Daily, in fact he has been appointed Daily representative for the Architectural Society. 
Monty is developing considerable technique in cover drawing, not to mention boxing. 
Brian McGreevy, Arts II, is still doing fine work for the Daily, reporting the doings 
of Medical Societies and the like. Besides lending his support to the Players Club, he 
is active in inter-class debating. And here it might be of interest to mention that he 
was the founder and charter member of the new B.C.S. Club — The Alpha Tourists. 
McGreevy, Auld and Breakey have graciously thrown open their sumptuous suite on 
University Street as club rooms. They make remarkable hosts. 

"Pinkie" McMaster, Commerce III, is a class officer and a member of the Scarlet 
Key Society (a society to which each Faculty elects a number of representatives) . Pinkie 
has lost none of the cheerfulness and enthusiasm of his school days. 

"Cow" O'Meara, Arts III, distinguished himself on the Intermediate football team 
this season. He is at present training for the boxing team. From his bowler and his 
cigars we might almost mistake Cow for the famous Jim Jeffries. 

H. R. Montgomery, Science III, fills an ever-increasing number of important 
offices around the University. He is Vice-President of Science Juniors, a member of the 
Union House Committee, and a member of the Scarlet Key Society. At the time of 
writing he is nominated for the Students' Council. 

Weir Davis, Arts IV, has again turned out for the Gym. Team. It is whispered 
over the teacups that Bug's moustache is the cutest on the campus. 

"Bunny" Glassford, Arts IV, stroked the McGill eight again this year We heard 
a lot of good scandal about Bunny, but he has changed girls and we are not able to keen 
it up. F 

Tommy Henderson, Law I, having graduated last spring with honours in Philoso- 
phy, has returned to college to take up his studies for a career at the Bar. 

Johnny Casgrain, Law I, is back again this year; however, he has left Arts and is 
in Law. Johnny drives a Ford now. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 85 



Johnny Malo and Dick Taylor are often noticed about the town. 

Vassie Bancroft when last heard of was holding down the position of teller in the 
Bank of Montreal at St. John, N.B. He is doing very well and is a thorough man about 
town. 

Gordie Reid was in Montreal this fall on the rather unpleasant business of having 

two operations. 

"Gordie" Neill is going to the University of New Brunswick; from all accounts 
he seems to like it very much (either the U. or the Co-eds, we are not sure which). 

"Rocky" Smith played sub. for Bishop's this fall. 

Greig has been in Japan since June; but is expected to be seen in Montreal at 
Christmas. 

"Bud" Colby has drifted out to Winnipeg on business, the last we heard of him 
he was working hard (take it or leave it). 

"Piggy" Smith is still convalescing, he hopes to go to McGill next fall. 

(From Sherbrooke Daily Record) 

The United States army has four outstanding officers of Canadian birth whose 
services at one time have been intimately connected with British and Canadian armed 
forces. Of these, two brothers, Lieutenant-Colonel Robert U. Patterson and Lieutenant- 
Colonel William Lay Patterson, were educated at B.C.S., (1887-1890) and (1887-1891). 

The Patterson brothers were born in Canada and both attended McGill University. 

Lieutenant-Colonel Robert U. Patterson, a member of the army medical corps, 
has had more contact with Canadian and British soldiers than any of the others. 
He left the United States for England as commanding officer of base hospital No. 5, 
May 6, 1917, being among the second American units to go overseas. From May, 
1917, to February, 1918, Colonel Patterson commanded the base hospital No. 5 with the 
British expeditionary force at Cannes-Damiers and Boulogne. This hospital cared for 
50,000 British troops after the Messines push, starting in June, 1917, many of whom were 
Canadian troopers. On September 4th, 1917, Colonel Patterson's hospital was bombed 
at Cannes-Damiers, and the first officers and enlisted men of the United States army to 
die after the United States entered the war lost their lives in this hospital. 

Colonel Patterson's military record is filled with evidence that shows he is a fighting 
man, despite the fact that his service has been with medical units. He was twice awarded 
citations for gallantry in action during the Phillipine Insurrection while caring for wound- 
ed under fire. He was also cited in a despatch of Field Marshal Sir Douglas Haig on 
November 7th, 1917, for gallant and distinguished service in the field. 

He was assistant division surgeon of the first American division at Cantigny, and 
with the second American division in fighting around Belleau Wood. He also served as 
a member of the American military mission to Italy, and was made an officer of the 
Order of the Crown of Italy. Colonel Patterson was born in Montreal, June 16th, 1877, 
and educated at B.C.S. from 1882 to 1890, and graduated from the Montreal Collegiate 
Institute and McGill University in 1898. He is now commanding officer of the Army 
and Navy General Hospital at Hot Springs, Arkansas. 



86 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 

Lieutenant-Colonel William Lay Patterson (B.C.S. 1887-1891), was born in Canada, 
September 29th, 1874, and graduated from Bishop's College School at Lennoxville, and 
attended McGill University for one year. He had no service overseas during the world 
war, but made a trip to Europe in 1919 in connection with the investigation of aerial 
defenses of the allied armies. He served for five and a half years with the air corps, 
and is now attached to the adjutant-general's department at Chicago. 



The following Old Boys were present on Thanksgiving Day: — John F. Acer, G. Auld, 

C. P. Baker, A. Breakey, D. K. Black, R. Blinco, R. M. Campbell, J. N. Dill, P. Doucet, 
T. S. Gillespie, G W. Hall, H. L. Hall, N. Hanna, C. D. Johnston, A. Lewis, B. Lewis, 

D. Luther, H. S. McGreevy, G. H. Montgomery, G McCrea, R. McCrea, W. Mitchell, 
J. A. Malo, A. J. O'Meara, J. H. Price, A. Paton, J. H. Patton, R. Patton, W. Russell, 
C. Rankin, M. Robb, G. Reid, L. M. Smith, E. Roeksborough Smith, the Right Reverend 
Lennox Williams, Bishop of Quebec. 

In accordance with a suggestion made to him by several Old Boys, the Headmaster 
has made arrangements by which brass plates may be put on the board on the main stair- 
case at the following rates:— for small plate with single name, SI. 00 plus twenty cents for 
each letter or figure; for plates 2]4 inches by 7 inches (large enough to take six names), 
11.25 plus twenty cents per letter, or eighteen cents if there are more letters than fifty. 
These plates will be of brass with dull finish and lacquered, and the lettering will be in 
black. Old Boys wishing to put up plates may thus calculate the cost and send cheques 
to the Headmaster. 

R. C. S. Kaulbach, KG, of Lunenburg, Nova Scotia, has verv generously under- 
taken to supply yearly in perpetuity a silver medal for the Open Mile Race, an event 
which he won in 1888. A special die is being prepared for this. 

Mr. Kaulbach, who is at present enjoying the winter sports at St. Moritz in Switzer- 
land, promises a framed diagram illustrating figure skating. This will be hung in the 
reading room. 

Horace Lewis (1908-17), of Toronto, is looking forward to a trip to England with the 
Canadian Squash Racquets team this winter. 

An old boy, whose identity we do not disclose, writes that, when he had to appear 
lately before a County Judge for exceeding the speed limit, he received such a calling down 
that for the moment ho thought he was back at school. 

TRANS-ATLANTIC PASSENGER KNOWN TO SHERBROOKE PEOPLE 

Mr. Elwood B. Hosmer, who is a passenger on the aeroplane "The Whale" which 
will attempt to fly across the Atlantic from Europe, is known to a number of people in 
Sherbrooke He is a son of Mr. G H. Hosmer, of Montreal, one of the leading busmess 
men of that city and a director of the Canadian Pacific Railway, and was educated at 
Bishop's College School in Lennoxville. 

"The Whale," piloted by Captain Courtney, started its trans-Atlantic flight at the 
end of last week, but was forced to land at Corunna, Spain, after proceeding several: 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



87 



hundred miles, on account of weather conditions. The party are now waiting for better 

weather to proceed across the ocean. In the mean tune they are being entertained m 

Spain, and on Tuesday made an excursion from Corunna to Santiago, and on Wednesday 

were guests of the British Consul at Corunna. 

(Sherbrooke Daily Record) 

GRANBY, August 22nd.— The death occurred here yesterday of Mr. William H. 
Robinson, a prominent and highly respected citizen of the Eastern Townships, who 
passed on as he was reaching the eightieth mark in his life. Mr. Robinson was past 
president of the Canadian Consolidated Rubber Company, Limited, Montreal. 

The late William Hezekiah Robinson was born at, Waterloo on April 17th, 1848. 
He was educated at the Shefford Academy, Waterloo; and later at Bishop's College 
School, Lennoxville (1862-63) ami Military Schools, Montreal. 

The late Mr. Robinson also had an active military life having served as Ensign No. 1 
Waterloo Company, on active service during the Fenian Raids, 1866; captain and pay- 
master, 79th Battalion, Shefford Highlanders, 1871; and honorary major, retiring in 
1879. 

He was also a member of several clubs and organizations including the British 

Empire Club, London, England; Engineer's Club, Montreal; St. James' Club, Montreal. 

and also belonged to the masonic order. In religion, Mr. Robinson was an Anglican, 

and in politics a Conservative. 

(Sherbrooke Daily Record) 




NEW MEMORIAL SKATING RINK. 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



"GOD'S IN HIS HEAVEN." 

When the fall is new, and the sky is blue, 

And the hoar frost shrouds the dawn, 
I will mount my horse and we'll shake remorse, 

And the world is ours to pawn. 

When his hoof beats drum and our heart strings thrum, 

And his silky mane flies free, 
I will know a joy that will never cloy, 

As we thunder o'er the lea. 

R. McA. CAMPBELL, '26. 



**^F%& 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



89 




The marriage of Miss Rachel Mary Hague, younger daughter of Mr. and Mrs. 
H. J. Hague, Dorchester Street West, to Mr. Robert Neil McLeod (B.C.S. 1910-17), 
eldest son of the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert McLeod took place at St. George's Church 
on Wednesday afternoon, September 7th, at four o'clock. (Courtesy Montreal Daily Star) 



90 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 




ENGAGEMENTS 



From the Montreal Gazette- 



Lieut. -Col. and Mrs. Herbert Molson announce the engagement of their daughter, 
Mary Dorothy to Mr. Hartland Campbell MacDougall, .son of Major and Mrs. Hartland 
B. MacDougall. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Coddington Meyer, Jr., Highland Ave., Montclair, N.J., have 
announced the engagement of their daughter Emily Louise Meyer to Claude Landor 
Peters, son of Mr. and Mrs. Claude Walker Peters, of Garden City, Long Island. 



BIRTHS 

To Major and Mrs. J. H. Price, at Quebec, on June 23rd, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. 0. 0. Price (Cousie) at Kenogami, in August, a son. 

To Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Ross, of Rimouski, a daughter. 




BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



91 




Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Auguste Durnford, of Montreal. 

Mrs. Durnford was formerly Miss Amy Maxwell Mackenzie, daughter of 

Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Mackenzie, of Montreal. Mr. Durnford is the son 

of the late Mr. A. Durnford and Mrs. Durnford. 

(Courtesy Toronto Saturday Night) 



92 BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



THE FRENCH REVOLUTION 
(Reign of Terror) 

The made red revolution 

Is reeling down the street, 
The fleur-de-lys lies trodden 

Beneath the clumsy feet. 

A crazed, high, frenzied shrieking 

Arises from the crowd ; 
The tumbrils creaking, creaking, 

The corpse without a shroud. 

The dance of death is whirling 

With piercing sunken eyes; 
The heavy smoke is curling 

To leaden downcast skies. 

The gallant noble pride 

Which once belonged to France 

Is smothered in the tide 

Of blood. The devils dance. 

R. McA. C. '26 




BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



93 




LAW PRIZE WINNER 
John Jeoffrey Porteous 

of Montreal, who graduated with the de- 
gree of Bachelor of Civil Law at McGill, 
receiving the Lieutenant-Governor's Sil- 
ver Medal for Roman Law. 




HP 



WON PRINCE'S MEDAL 
Thomas Greenshields Henderson 

of Montreal, winner of the Prince of 
Wales' Gold Medal for Mental and Mo- 
ral Philosophy awarded in the final year 
of Arts at McGill. (Courtesy Montreal Star) 




94 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



SUBSCRIBERS TO MAGAZINE fOLD BOYS) 



The Lord Bishop of Quebec. 

Sir. H. Montagu Allan, C.V.O.. Montreal. 

A. C. Abbott, Montreal. 
John N. D'Arcy, Montreal. 
General Sir Henry Burstall, K.GB., 

K.C.M.G., England. 
G. H. Balfour, Winnipeg, Man. 
L. E. Baker, Yarmouth, N.S. 
F. C. Billingsley, Winnipeg, Man. 
Drury, Capt. M., St. Johns, Que. 
John Casgrain, Montreal. 
Lt.-Col. A. 0. H. Dean, Montreal. 
L. W. Davis, Montreal. 
T. K. Foster, Knowlton, Que. 
E. W. Farwell, Sherbrooke, Que. 
Arthur D. Fry, Montreal. 
Kenneth F. Gihnour, Montreal. 
Frank B. Grundy, Sherbrooke, Que. 

B. C. Hutchison, Montreal. 
M. C. Holt, Montreal. 
Tommy Henderson, Montreal. 

H. T. Heneker, Pointe Claire, Que. 
Wilshire Harcourt, Bronxville, N.Y. 
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Major-General Sir W. C. Heneker, Salis- 
bury Plain, England. 
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Harry King, Quebec City. 
Roderick Kane, Montreal. 
D. Allan Laurie, Quebec City. 
W. P. Laurie, Quebec City. 
A. Joly de Lotbiniere, Ploint Platon, Que. 
A. C. Joly de Lotbiniere, London, England. 
Herbert McGreevy, Quebec City 
G. W. McGreevy, Quebec City 
H. B. MacDougall, Montreal. 
J. D. Molson, Montreal. 
H. deM. Molson, Montreal. 
G. H. Montgomery, K.C., Montreal. 
Brock Maclaren, Montreal. 
T. H. MacKinnon, Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Benson McNaughton, Thetford Mines, Que. 



R. H. Morewood, Grand'Mere, Que. 

D. S. Neel, Montreal. 

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J. A. Paddon, St. John's, Nfld. 

W. Wynne Robinson, Montreal. 

James G. Russell, Cap Chat, Que. 

Godfrey W. Rhodes, Bergerville, Que. 

F. M. Robb, Montreal. 

J. Gordon Ross, Rimouski, Que. 
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W. W. Ogilvie, Montreal, Que. 

Horace H. Stewart, St. Johnsbury, Vt, 

H. H. Sims, Montreal, Que. 

F. E. A. Faii-weather, Vawn, Sask. 
Percy L. Douglas, Montreal. 

T. E. Montgomery, M.D., Phillipsburg. 
W. J. Whitehead, Three Rivers, Que. 
J. N. Ready, Toronto, Ont. 
George Breakey, Breakeyville, Que. 
Pemberton Smith, Montreal, Que. 
O. C. Smith, Thetford Mines, Que. 
S. L. Peters, Garden City, N.Y, 



BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



95 



SUBSCRIBERS TO MAGAZINE (OLD BOYS)— Continued 



Robert Howard, Montreal, P.Q. 
C. C. Smith, Quebec, Que. 

C. E. Cleveland, Danville, Que. 

R. E. MacDougall, Montreal, Que. 

D. Forbes Angus, Montreal, Que. 
J. J. M. Ross, Montreal, Que. 

R. C. S. Kaulbach, KG, Lunenburg, N.S. 

J. S. Keator, Halifax, N.S. 

W. F. Dawson, Montreal. 

G. S. Reade, Bella Bella, B.C. 

G. N. Moseley, St. Hyacinthe, P.Q. 

E. B. Cochrane, Florida, U.S.A. 
H. S. Cochrane, Kenogami, P.Q. 
G. A. C. Holt, Boston, Mass. 



Deniston Breakey, Breakeyville, Co. Levis 

Que. 
G. M. Stearns, Jr., Lake Megantic, Que. 
C, M. Le Troop, Newton, B.C. 
J. S. Thornton, New York. 
C. E. Allen Boswell, Quebec. 
George K. Craig, Quebec. 
W. M. Conyers, Hamilton, Bermuda. 
E. S. Antle, Ocean Falls, B.C. 
J. Morris, Charlottetown, P.E.I. 
H. S. Cochrane, Montreal. 
E. B. Cochrane, North Hatley 
Philippe Roy, Chateau St. Louis, P.Q. 
Brian I. McGreevy, McGill. 



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BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 



97 




THE WETHERBY'S HOUSE PARTY 



I checked my luggage and boarded the 2.15 for Scotland. My destination was 
Willesden, a little village where my cousin, Richard Wetherby, has a large, spacious house. 
I was going to join a house party of about ten people, mostly, I may say, distinguished 
people; and as the Wetherbys' were rich — enormously rich — and quite intellectual, 1 
knew I would have a pleasant week-end. I arrived at about seven, excruciatingly hungry, 
and worn out by the journey which was very tedious. I, apparently, was the last to 
arrive, and my hostess and cousin, Corinne Wetherby, introduced me to her guests when 
I came down for dinner. First, I was introduced to Lady Harding, wife of the well- 
known politician, then to Count Vladia of the old Russian nobility, Bill Farrell — good- 
looking, tall and bronzed — and his sister Mary, who, rumour has it, was engaged to the 
Count; then Jane Ranson, the American dancer, and for the rest Lord Harding and my 
old school friend Gordon Hughes. These names are very important so, dear reader, 
please remember them. 

On Saturday morning Corinne, who, sad to say, was on the wrong side of forty 
though still very striking in appearance, proposed that we should all go in for a dip, as 
they have a lake at the bottom of the garden. I, having passed the age when swimming- 
is a pleasure, did not go clown to the water, but talked with Hughes and Richard. Seldom 
have I known such a gossip as Richard. Apparently Bill Farrel was having an affair 
with Jane Ranson, and as Bill was Oorinne's second cousin, he had asked leave to bring 
Jane up for the week-end, since she was going back to the States the following week'. 
Bill was twenty-eight and, as Richard said "old enough to know better." No scandal, 
strange as it may seem, was brought up about the Count, except the fact that he was not 
of the real Russian blood. Lady Harding was an old amour of LIughes, and as she did not 
swim they went walking round the grounds, reminiscing. Poor Lord Harding was 
driven to distraction and drank many more gin and sodas than were good for him, until 
he started flirting with Corinne. This upset Richard, who is terribly jealous, and so 
the party, with the exception of the younger generation, was not very agreeable. 




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.;' I, 

[ ! ' . ■ ' 

We were all told that at dinner that evening Jane would danee. Why this was 
arranged, especially at dinner, was more than I could see. However, at 8.15 sharp we 
assembled in the drawing room for cocktails; the Count took Corinne in to dinner and 
we all paired off and followed. Corinne sat at the head of the table with the Count on 
her left, then Mary and Hughes, Richard and Lady Harding, Bill, Jane and myself 
next to Corinne. I must admit that Jane looked charming in a white dress, barely to 
the knees, with a huge flower on her shoulder; but Corinne was beautiful in black, with 
the most wonderful pearl choker that I have ever seen. Bill, too, looked very handsome 
in an immaculate white waistcoat and tie. I was amazed at the lighting of the room, 
there was a huge chandelier which was connected by a plug in the wall. Corinne after- 
wards told me that the room had been electrically fitted just for the houseparty, but 
the main dining room was not used when she and Richard were-alone. After coffee, 
the butler Jenkins, brought in a gramaphone and Jane did one of her dances. It was 
very well done, but rather on the vulgar side. Then Bill and Jane danced, and while 
they were on the floor Count Vladia asked if he might see the pearls. Corinne handed 
them round and as they came to me I tilted my chair back to get them, it went over 
backwards, disconnecting the light, and the pearls rolled under the table. There was 
quite a little confusion, but finally the butler got the light connected; the light went on 
but the Count's chair was empty. Everybody jumped up and Lady Harding, looking 
under the table, screamed and fainted, because under the table with a knife in his back 
lay Count Vladia! 

Richard, whom I must say had the most wonderful presence of mind, hurried us, 
all into the drawing room and telephoned for a doctor, also notifying Scotland Yard. 
The ladies were panic stricken, Corinne could only weep, and the only one who seemed 
not in the least upset was Mary. She tried to cry, but could not. About an hour and 
three-quarters later men arrived from Scotland Yard; they examined the body, and found 
that the knife which had been thrown bore the butler's finger prints. In the middle of 
all the excitement Corinne clutched her throat and missed the pearls. They were searched 
for in every conceivable place but could not be found. The butler insisted that he had 
never touched the knife, but the evidence was too strong and he was arrested. Scotland 
Yard took finger prints of the Count and identified him as none other than the illustrious 
"Scar" Blaire who was after the pearls. But the question was, where were the pearls ? 
Detective Brown, who was put in charge of the case, smoked endless cigars and paced 
the dining room all night trying to solve the mystery of this extraordinary murder and 
the lost pearls. I felt certain that he suspected me, as I was conscious of always being 
under his scrutiny. Brown asked me to spend the remainder of the night with him, 
and requested me to spend it in the hall, as he thought somebody would try a "bolt act." 
He was not wrong, to my great surprise. At about five o'clock a woman in travelling 
suit and a fur coat pulled up to the ears came clown the stairs. I stepped forward to stop 
her and to my amazement found it to be Jane, the dancer. She screamed and would 
have dashed past me had I not caught and held her. Brown came up to us and to my 
Surprise and horror searched her then and there. He finally gave a cry of victory and j 
produced a tissue paper parcel. In it were the pearls. Jane had hysterics and raved I 
about Bill and Corinne and told Brown to get Bill at once. Brown went up to Bill's 



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BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 101 

room — most of the household was awake by now — and in a minute came down wearing 
a sinister expression. He signalled to me to come over to him, and told me that Mr. 
"Farrell had shot himself in the head! The ease was getting more than complicated, but 
was cleared up by Jane, who now had practically recovered and told the following story. 

Bill and Corinne had for a long time been lovers, but the fact was naturally kept a 
secret from Richard; but Corinne, who was exceedingly heartless, kept Bill's letters, 
turned them over to a blackmailing institution and blackmailed Bill, getting a good 
commission from the blackmailer. Bill, who now was broke, had to have money to pay 
this last payment. Never dreaming that the money was going to Corinne, he thought 
up a plan for stealing her pearls. In the meantime he had married Jane, and she would 
be a helper in his crime. But somebody must be brought in to help them, and the butler, 
knowing what a rotter Corinne was, and how fine Bill was, promised to help them. But 
Bill, who had fallen into bad hands, trying to get money for the blackmailers, found out 
that "Scar" Blaire was after the pearls too and thought that it would be easy to get 
them himself and lay the blame on Blaire. When I dropped the pearls under the table, 
Bill picked them up, but Blaire dived for them and Jenkins stabbed him in the back. 
Jane said that now Bill was gone she would go too, but so would Corinne, and before 
anyone could stop her she had whipped out a "silencer" revolver from her handbag and 
killed Corinne and herself. Poor wretched girl, she was only a guttersnipe, and yet 
she stood by Bill through thick and thin. 

Richard, I am sorry to say, never recovered; the shock was too great, and his nerves 
were at an end. He died of a stroke three weeks later. 

And so Corinne, to all outward appearance a beautiful and recherche woman, was 
at heart a miserable, cruel one. 

H. I. KENNEDY 




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BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 103 

THE MYSTERY OF THE SAN JUAN 

By Boswell I and Drummond. 
Chapter I. 

It was in the .year 1907, on March 20th, when the captain of the "City of Glasgow", 
a freighter bound for Buenos Aires, sighted a tramp steamer about 3 leagues distant, 
which he recognized as the ship of his old acquaintance, Captain John Williams. He 
ordered a boat to be lowered and put off for his friend's ship, the San Juan. On approach- 
ing the steamer he observed no signs of life, and on boarding the ship and examining it, 
it was clear to him that the captain and crew had deserted. 

Chapter II 

They had taken the life boats; the Cargo was untouched with the exception of a cask 
of alcohol which had been broached. The last entry in the log was February 28th, 1907, 
so that about three weeks had elapsed since the crew had left. The machinery was in 
perfect order and evidently the crew had left in a hurry. No traces of blood or any 
mutiny could be found ; the hammocks and bunks were in an untidy state ; all the navi- 
gating instruments had been taken. The Captain of the City of Glasgow signalled his 
ship and ordered them to take the San Juan in tow. The port authorities at Buenos 
Aires made enquiries and offered rewards for information of the lost crew, and although 
all the neighbouring sea coast was watched for months afterwards, the mystery remained 
unsolved. 

Chapter III. 

Time passed and one clay the City of Glasgow touched at an out-of-the-way port in 
the Falkland Islands. The Captain learned from the natives that 18 months previously 
two castaways had landed on the eastern end of the Island. The Captain's thoughts 
instantly turned to the San Juan, and, determined to investigate, he told the native chief 
to lead him to the castaways. He was taken to their rude dwelling, where he found the 
Captain of the San Juan with a stowaway whom he had found on board the ship after it 
left port. This was the Captain's story. 

Chapter IV. 

On the evening of February 27th I visited the hold and found a cask of alcohol 
broached. I asked the crew if they knew anything about the cask— that a stowaway was 
on board never entered my head. Next morning I found to my horror that the crew 
had deserted the ship. I suppose, being very superstitious, they believed the cask had • 
been opened by evil spirits. Deciding to try and make for the nearest port, I discovered j 
that there was not enough food on board nor was there coal enough in the bunkers. It ij 
was then that I found the stowaway, who afterwards told me that he had broached the ;| 
cask. He and I decided to take the remaining food and boat and make for shore. Having j 
no compass, this was a dangerous undertaking, but we made the attempt, and, blown out • 
of our course, landed on this island. The boats with the crew must have capsized as no 
trace of them has been found. 




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COMPLIMENTS 
of 



ames (Lonstine 
Co., Limited 



V 
V 



MONTREAL 



That's Why- 



Our long experience in 
the trade has taught us 
that we prosper only in 
measure as we please our 
friends. That is why we 
constantly endeavor to 
satisfy you. 



MARKUS HANNA & SONS 

Dry Goods and Clothing 

ESTABLISHED 1911 



GRAND'MERE, 



QUEBEC 



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111 




*a« 



~««3rgfe%nsg 

\\l \\\\\\\\\\\\ft\\\ RlvalsihebeautyoftkeScarktTanager \ 

Why We Feature 

barker 
'DuofoU 

—the Ten -with 
the 25 -Tear 
guaranteed Toint 

Because this Pen em- 
bodies the high stand- 
ard of excellence we 
require in all the goods 
we sell our customers. 

Orer-size T)uofold $7 
<Duofold Jr. £5 Lady 1>uofold £5 

D. R. CLARK 
Lennoxville, Que. 

Headquarters for 
PARKER PENS AND PENCILS 




& 



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;j£-iiViitf» 



•<; :_#*£*-*< 






112 



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The Best Christmas 



and 



New Year's Gift 

A Subscription to 

MONTREAL 

Canada's Best Newspaper 

Established 1778 
By Mail, $9.00 per year. 




Successful Management 

of Estates 

Even if your estate is small, it will need the careful attention of a skilled 
and experienced Executor. In fact it is invariably the small estate that requires 
the most economical handling. 

This Trust Company always gives the same thoughtful attention to every estate 
that comes under its supervision and management, regardless of size. 

The comprehensive facilities of this large institution enables it to render the 
highest type of service to small estates at minimum costs. 



Consult us about your will. 



SIR HERBERT S. HOLT, President 
A. J. BROWN, K.C., Vice-President 
F. G. DONALDSON. Gen. Manager 



Montreal Trust 
Company 

1 1 Place d'Armes, Montreal 



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113 



McMURRAY'S 

LENNOXVILLE, QUE. 

Local Agents for 

Jl. G. Spalding & Bros. 

RELIABLE 

SPORTING GOODS 

Athletic Footwear and Clothing 
Tennis Rackets 

Tennis Balls 

Golf Balls, Etc. 

Semi-Ready Tailoring 



SPECIAL ATTENTION GIVEN 
TO ALL SCHOOL ORDERS 



McMURRAY'S Lennoxville, Que. 



114 



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Winners! 



Just as a Strong Attack 

or a Good Defence 
Will Win in Sports 
So a Bank Book 




Will Take 
You Safely 




* Over Life's 
Hurdles 



The Royal Bank 
of Canada 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



Lafleur, MacDougall, Macfarlane & Barclay 

Advocates 



Royal Trust Chambers 
MONTREAL 



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115 



BROWN, 

MONTGOMERY & 

McMICHAEL 

jldvocates, 

Barristers, 

Etc. 



Canadian Pacific Express Building 
MONTREAL 



Henry Gatehouse & Son 

Dealers and Importers of 

Fish, Oysters, Game, Poultry 
Eggs and Vegetables 

Telephones: Uptown 903-904-905-2724 

348 Dorchester Street West 

MONTREAL, QUE. 



Acer & Co., Limited 



PULP and PAPER 



SB 



CANADA CEMENT BUILDING 
MONTREAL 



Over J 200 Pipe Organs 

Built by 

Casavant Freres, Limitee 

ST. HYACINTHE, QUE. 



Established in 1879 



BURTON'S LIMITED 

Booksellers & Stationers 



Telephone Uptown 6834 

597 ST. CATHERINE STREET WEST 
MONTREAL 



116 



ADAMS & SIZE 

Insurance Brokers 



MONTREAL 



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mention B:€-.S. i Magazine 



COMPLIMENTS 
OF 

MOLSON'S 
BREWERY 

LIMITED 



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118 



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BARRETT'S 

Ice Cream, 

Confectionery, 

* 

High Grade Chocolates, 
Cigars, Cigarettes, 

Tobacco, 

Tea, Coffee, Cocoa 

and Sandwiches 

always ready. 

ti 

LENNOXVILLE, QUE. 

Formerly of Waterville, Que. 


Waterman's 

Ideal Fountain Pens 

Eversharp Pencils 


McKindsey's 
Drug Store 

LENNOXVILLE, QUE. 


For Quality and Service Try 

RL 

QUICK LUNCH 
AT ALL HOURS 

Next to C.N.R. Station 
LENNOXVILLE 


G. PENNINGTON 

SPORTS EQUIPMENT REPAIRED 

Custom Boot and 
Shoe Maker 

All work promptly executed 

LENNOXVILLE, - - QUEBEC 


M. J. BENNETT 

Picture Jf ramer 

Manufacturer of 
Hockey Sticks and Skiis. 

Dealer in Wall Paper. 
Gasoline and Motor Oils. 

College Street, LENNOXVILLE 


R. C. McFadden & Co. 

General 
Hardware 

B 

Main Street LENNOXVILLE 



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119 



ASK FOR 




MARKEY, HYDE & AHERN 



Hbbocateg 



Fred H. Markey, K.C. G. Gordon Hyde. K.C. 
John G. Ahern V. M. Lynch-Stauton 

G. B. PUDDICOMBE 




%jm i.~ COLDS MSwjt™. 
COUGHS, CROUP. TSj 
CRAMPS. COUIC. GRIP. ( 
BRONCHITIS. a 
DIARRHOEA. Hi 
& DYSENTERY.QUINSY, c^ 

■mmmmi&ifSiMr. 

**V IBURNS.-WWWJ 

SCALD5. BRUISES, * 
' TR05T 6ITES, SPRAINS. CUTS, 
LUMBAGO, RHEUMATIC 
^PAINS, CHILBLAINS 
.TOOTHACHE, i* 




FOR NEARLY 100 YEARS 



PERRY DAVIS' 

PAINKILLER 



has been used in all parts of the world 
as a liniment, to relieve 

SPRAINS, BRUISES, FROSTBITES 

and taken internally to check chills 

and thus prevent the 

development of 

COLDS, LA GRIPPE, PNEUMONIA 



50c. Bottles 



Sold Everywhere 



120 



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Lewis Brimacombe & Co. 

Chartered Accountants 



180 St. James Street MONTREAL 



GREENSHIELDS LIMITED 

VICTORIA SQUARE 

MONTREAL 



Wholesale Dry Goods 

House Furnishings and Smallwares 

Special Selling Agents for 

David & John Anderson 

Ginghams and Shirtings. 

John Shields & Co., Limited, Perth, Scotland 

Table Linens and Towels. 

Trefousse & Co., Chaumont, France 

Kid Suede and Wash Cape Gloves. 



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isa 



Earning and Spending 

YY/HETHER you are a newsboy, a bank president 
or a nation, financial security depends on your 
ability to earn more than you spend. 

When Canadians buy imported goods they are 
spending Canada's money. 

When Canadians buy Canadian-made goods they 
are keeping Canada's money "in the family" — and 
they are helping Canada to earn. 

Buy "Prue" products. They are made in Canada 
by Canadians for Canadians. 



DOMINION TEXTILE CO., LIMITED 

MONTREAL 



CANADA 



122 



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Laurentide Company 

Limited 
GRAND'MERE, QUEBEC 



Manufacturers of 



Newsprint Paper 
Wood Pulp Board 



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WITH THE COMPLIMENTS 
—OF— 

BOSWELLS BREWERY 

QUEBEC 
Canada's First Brewery 

Founded in 1668 



A bank where small accounts 
are welcome 

It is not necessary to wait until you have a 
substantial amount in hand before opening a 
Savings Account. You may start an account 
with the Bank of Montreal with any sum, from 
one dollar upwards, and thus make your spare 
dollars earn interest for you all the time. 

OPEN AN ACCOUNT 
WITH THE 

BANK OF MONTREAL 

Established 1817 



124 



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Riddell, Stead, Graham 
& Hutchison 

Chartered Jlccountants 



460 St 


Francois Xavier Street 




MONTREAL 




and at 


TORONTO 


VANCOUVER 


HAMILTON 


LONDON, England 


WINNIPEG 


EDINBURGH, Scotland 


CALGARY 


NEW YORK 



OPTICIANS 

R. N. Taylor & Co. 

Limited 
522 St. Catherine Street West 



THERMOMETERS, 
MOTOR GOGGLES, 

LORGNETTES, 
BINOCULARS and 

BAROMETERS 



Prescriptions and all kinds of 
Repair Work promptly executed. 




Real 



ESTATE 

AND 

INSURANCE 

Phones. 



MAIN2468&66Z4 



EWING 



EWING 

263S!JamesS! 



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1-2,5 



A.J.ARNOLD 



46 WELLINGTON STREET N. 
SHERBROOKE, QUE. 



Neckwear, Shirts 

Silk Squares 

Hosiery 

English Top Coats 

Aquarock Rain Coats 

Tress Hats and Caps 

Jaeger Woollens 

Dressing Jackets 

Gloves 
Suits To Order 
Borsalino Hats 



WITH THE 

COMPLIMENTS 

OF 

THE DENTAL COMPANY 
OF CANADA, LIMITED 



TORONTO MONTREAL 

OTTAWA QUEBEC 

WINNIPEG SASKATOON 



COMPLIMENTS OF 



BECK PRESS REG'D 

PRINTERS & DESIGNERS 

of 
ADVERTISING THAT SELLS 



126 



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mention B.C.S. Magazine 



EDUCATIONAL 
EQUIPMENT 



Pupil's Desks 

Teachers Desks 

Folding Chairs 

Auditorium Chairs 

School Stationery 

Blackboards 

"Everything for the School" 

E. N. Moyer Company, Limited 

"Canada s School Furnishers" 

106-108 York Street 

TORONTO 2, CANADA 



John Milford & Son 

Members of the Florists' Telegraph 
Delivery Association 

TELEPHONE 174 

138 WELLINGTON STREET NORTH 
SHERBROOKE, QUE. 



C. C. HUNTING 

Jeweller 

Gift — Ware 
Novelties and Silverware 

Special attention given to 
Watch and Jewellery Repairing. 



Main Street 



LENNOXVILLE 



Interior Furnishers 



The service of the 
Mitchell-Holland Shop 
is to the interior deco- 
ration and furnishing 
of your home, what the 
service of the expert 
Architect is, to the 
building itself. 




MITCHELL-HOLLAND & WARING-GILLOW, LIMITED 

589 ST. CATHERINE STREET WEST 



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127 



SHARP, MILNE & COY. 

Chartered Accountants 



POWER BUILDING 
MONTREAL 



MONTREAL NEW YORK TORONTO 



Buy CHRISTMAS SEALS 

AND HELP 

FIGHT TUBERCULOSIS 



Compliments of 

WILLIAMS-THOMAS, LIMITED 
POSTER ADVERTISERS 



128 



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Montreal Bond Company 

LIMITED 

Government, 

Municipal, 

Public Utility and 

Corporation 

Bonds 



v 
V 



205 ST. JAMES STREET 
MONTREAL 



R. G. SARE 



W. A. MELDRUM 



Compliments 
of 

JAMES S. NEILL 

& SONS, LIMITED 

FREDERICTON, 
N. B. 



CORONA FOURo 

The Ideal Typewriter for Home, College or Business. 



WM. M. HALL & CO. 



Write for Folder. 



1 58 Notre Dame Street West, MONTREAL 



THE BRETT COMPANY, LIMITED 

Importers and Outfitters 
MONTREAL 



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129 



TRY US FOR 



RELIABLE 

FURNITURE 



Jrf 



"Uhe 

McCaw-Bissell Furniture 

Company 

OPPOSITE COURT HOUSE 

SHERBROOKE 



FOR 

MEALS THAT PLEASE 

Be sure and visit 

THE 

Royal Candy Kitchen 

SHERBROOKE, QUE. 



With the Compliments 
of 

(Senbron Htmtteb 

JEWELLERS 

Corner King and Wellington Streets 
SHERBROOKE, QUE. 



J. S. Mitchell & Co. 

Limited 

BASEBALL, FOOTBALL, 
TENNIS, HOCKEY, 

GOLF, 

FISHING TACKLE, 

GUNS, RIFLES, 

AMMUNITION 



GENERAL 
SPORTING GOODS 

Wholesale and Retail 



SHERBROOKE, 



QUE. 



WELLS, LYNCH & WILSON 

Advocates, Barristers, &c. 

JOHN PERLEY WELLS. K.C. 

WALTER HAROLD LYNCH. K.C. 

KENNETH ALBERT WILSON. B.C.L. 



CABLE ADDRESS: 

"CAWDEN" 

WESTERN UNION CODE 



Telephone 423 

Thomas Lacroix 
TAXI 

Studebaker 7 Passenger 
Closed Car 



167 King East 



SHERBROOKE 



130 



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COMPLIMENTS 



of 



JAS. HENNESSY & CO 



COGNAC 

FRANCE 





GILLESPIE & CO. 

MONTREAL 
Agents for Canada 



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131 



ohn McEntyre, Limited 

2,8 St. Alexander Street 
MONTREAL 



V 
V 



B. H. PORTEOUS & CO. 

Stock a nd Bond Brokers 



B. HAZEN PORTEOUS 
MEMBER MONTREAL STOCK EXCHANGE 

CABLES: BURPORT 



17 St. John Street MONTREAL, Que. 



132 



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H. G. MUNRO 

LIMITED 


Bishop's College School 
is supplied by 


Sherbrooke s Largest Store 


Alex Ames & Sons, Limited 


jor 

Dry Goods, Best Quality 
Linens, Dress Goods 


WHOLESALE 
BUTCHERS 


Silks, Ready-to-Wear 
Millinery and 




4L^Jt 


Lingeries 


mUm 




WELLINGTON STREET SOUTH 


TELEPHONE 1600 


SHERBROOKE, QUE. 


j 

CHOICE 

Fresh Groceries 


MacKinnon Steel 
company, limited 


V 


SHERBROOKE, QUE. 


Fruits in Season 


T 


Shelf Hardware 

Sherwin-lVilliams Paints 

and Oils 

v 


Steel Plate and 

Structural Work 

of every description 


C. C. CHADDOCK 


■ — n 


THE SQUARE 
LENNOXVILLE, QUE. 


MONTREAL OFFICE: 
555 NEW BIRKS BUILDING 



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133 



HARTLAND B. MACDOUGALL 

ROBT. E. MACDOUGALL 

NORMAN ROOT 

H. C. MACDOUGALL 



MacDougall & MacDougall 

Stock and Bond Brokers 

Members of Montreal Stock Exchange 
Members of Montreal Curb Exchange 



Private Wires to 

New York and Toronto 

Quebec City, Que. 

Cornwall, Ont. 



TELEPHONE MAIN 258* 



102 NOTRE DAME STREET WEST 
MONTREAL 



CODES- [HARTFIELD NEW WALL STREET 
uuut.3. | BENTLEY s 

CABLE ADDRESS: TOM ACS 



134 



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COMPLIMENTS OF 



MEAD, PATTON 8c CO., INC. 

366 MADISON AVENUE 

NEW YORK 



(guaranty Inbe-stment Corporation 

ILimiteb 

Bonds and Investment Securities 
Insurance 



Suite 1010 Canada Cement Building 
MONTREAL, QUE. 

J. I. RANKIN, President J. E. STEELE, Secretary 

Please patronize our advertisers and mention B.C.S. Magazine 135 



Compliments 

OF 

PRICE BROTHERS & COMPANY 

LIMITED 

QUEBEC, QUE. 



136 



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Compliments 



OF THE 



Quebec Central Railway 



J. H. BRYANT, LIMITED 

Manufacturers of 

BULL'S HEAD GINGER ALE 

and 

EXTRA DRY GINGER ALE 

"Purity and Cleanliness" our Watchwords 

Established 1896 



T. E. BURTON 

D. D. S. 



LENNOXVILLE, QUE. 



R. OLIVIER & FRERE 

53 King Street West, SHERBROOKE 

New and Popular Fiction 

Oxford University Press Publications 

Nelson's Classics and Novels 

Canadian-English and American Magazines 

Christmas Annuals 

Full line of Imported Cards for all occasions 

Christmas. New Year's. Birthday, 

Remembrance, Friendship, etc. 



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137 



"Riley" Hern 

Headquarters for 

COLLEGIATE CLOTHES 

IMPORTED HABERDASHERY 

SPALDING 

ATHLETIC GOODS 



SPECIAL 

Bishop's College Ties, $1.00. 

Mail Orders Filled. 



132 Peel Street 
montreal 

Near Windsor Hotel 



PETERY 

SCHOOL BARBER 

Excellent Work done by 
Experienced Men. 

KING STREET 
SHERBROOKE, QUE. 



PERSONAL GIFT 

For those you love. 

There's nothing so distinctive 

as your Portrait. 

For the best, — go to 

Gustafsoris Studio 

54a WELLINGTON STREET 
SHERBROOKE. QUE. 



THE NEW SHERBROOKE 




Corner Depot and King Streets 

(Situated in Centre of City) 

Elevator Service. 

Solid Brick Building. 

Thoroughly Modern. 

165 Rooms — 75 with Bath attached. 

New addition and alterations 

completed 1927. 

Long Distance Telephone 

in every room. 

20 Commercial Sample Rooms. 

Garage Connection. 
WM. WRIGHT, Proprietor. 



Rosemary Gift Shop 

BOOKS 

GREETING CARDS 

GIFTS 

2 Dufferin Avenue, SHERBROOKE 



W.H. JOHNSTON 

MAIN STREET 
LENNOXVILLE, QUE. 



Choice Groceries 
and Automobile Accessories 



138 



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BISHOP'S COLLEGE SCHOOL MAGAZINE 139 



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Acer & Co., Ltd., Montreal 116 

Adams & Size 116 

Ames, Alex & Sons, Sherbrooke 133 

Arnold, A. J 126 

Bank of Montreal 124 

Barrett's, Lennoxville 119 

Beck Press, Reg'd 126 

Bennett, M. J., Lennoxville 119 

Berner-Palmer Co 105 

Boswell's Brewery, Quebec 124 

Breakey, Limited, Breakey ville, Que Cover 

Brett Company, Ltd 129 

Brown, Montgomery & McMichael, Canadian 

Pacific Express Bldg., Montreal 116 

Bryant, J. H., Ltd., Sherbrooke 137 

Burton's Limited 116 

Burton, T. E., Lennoxville 137 

Casavant Freres, Limitee, St. Hyacinthe 116 

Chaddock, C. C, Lennoxville 133 

Clark, D. R 112 

Coristine Co., Ltd Ill 

Craig, Luther & Irvine, Montreal 109 

Crown Laundry, Sherbrooke 107 

Davis & Lawrence Co., Montreal (for Davis' 

Painkiller) 120 

Dental Company of Canada 126 

Dominion Textile Co., Ltd 122 

Ewing & Ewing 125 

F. L. Quick Lunch, Lennoxville 119 

Gatehouse, Henry & Son, 348 Dorchester St. 

Montreal 116 

Gazette, Montreal 113 

Gendron Ltd., Sherbrooke 130 

Greenshields, Limited 121 

Guaranty Investment Corp., Suite 1010 Canada 

Cement Bldg., Montreal 135 

Gurd's Ginger Ales 1 20 

Gustafson's Studio, Sherbrooke 138 ' 

Hall, Wm. M. & Co 129 

Hanna & Sons Ill 

Henderson, John & Co 108 

Hennessy & Co., Jas 131 

Hunting, C. C, Lennoxville 127 

Jackman, F. J. Ltd., Montreal 106 

Jaeger 107 

Johnston, W. H., Lennoxville 138 

Lacroix, Thomas, Taxi, Sherbrooke 130 

Lafleur, MacDougall, Macfarlane & Barclay, 

Montreal 115 

Laurentide Co., Ltd., Grand'Mere, Que 123 

Lewis Brimacombe & Co., Montreal 121 



Page 
MacDougall & MacDougall, 102 Notre Dame W. 

Montreal I 34 

MacKinnon Steel Co., Ltd., Sherbrooke 133 

Magic Baking Powder 100 

Mappin & Webb, Ltd., Montreal 104 

Markey, Hyde & Ahern 120 

McCaw-Bissell Furniture Co., Sherbrooke 130 

McEntyre Ltd. John 132 

McFadden, R. C. & Co., Lennoxville 119 

McKindsey's Drug Store, Lennoxville 119 

McMurray's, Lennoxville 114 

Mead, Patton & Co., Inc., 366 Madison Ave., 

New York 135 

Milford, John & Son, Sherbrooke 127 

Mitchell-Holland & Waring-Gillow, Ltd 127 

Mitchell, J. S. & Co., Limited, Sherbrooke 130 

Molson's Brewery, Limited 117 

Montreal Bond Co., Ltd 129 

Montreal Trust Co., 11 Place D'Armes, Montreal 113 

Moyer Co. Ltd., E. N 127 

Munro, H. G, Sherbrooke 133 

National Citv Co., 205 St. James and St. Peter 

Streets, Montreal 102 

Neill, James S. & Son, Fredericton, N.B 129 

Neilson's Chocolates 98 

New Sherbrooke House, Sherbrooke 138 

Olivier & Frere 137 

Page Printing & Binding Co., Sherbrooke Ill 

Pennington, G., Lennoxville 119 

Petery, School Barber, Sherbrooke 138 

Phillips, Eugene F., Electrical Works, Montreal. 

Cover 
Porteous, B. H.& Co., 17 St. John St. Montreal. 132 
Price Bros. & Co., Limited, Quebec 136 

Quebec Central Railway Co., Sherbrooke 137 

Riddell, Stead, Graham & Hutchison, 460 St. 

Frs.-Xavicr St., Montreal 125 

"Riley" Hern, 132 Peel St., Montreal 138 

Rosemary Gift Shop 138 

Rosenbloom's, Sherbrooke 105 

Royal Bank of Canada, Lennoxville 115 

Royal Candy Kitchen, Sherbrooke 130 

Royal Exchange Assurance of London, Eng 110 

Sharp, Milne & Co., Montreal 128 

Taylor, R. N. & Co., Montreal 125 

Turret Cigarettes og 

Underwood Typewriter 105 

Wabasso Cottons, Three Rivers, Que 109 

Wells, Lynch & Wilson 130 

Whitehead, E. A. Co., Ltd., The 100 

Williams-Thomas, Ltd 128 

Wilson, H. C. & Sons, Sherbrooke 107 



Compliments of 



John Breakey 



Limited 



Breakeyville, Que. 



Monolyped and printed by Page Print, Sherbrooke, Que. 



. -■■;-.>■